Hi I suffer with cystic fibrosis and I also have MRSA in the lungs and I was wondering if it is possible that I can get tattoos..

Be cautious. Speak with your pulmonologist who is most familiar with your current status for clearance, but Pseudomonas colonization in the lungs should not usually prevent you from having procedures performed on your skin. You have listed MRSA as one of your conditions, which may put you at much higher risk for severe skin infection from a tattoo.

Related Questions

Where can I go to get a cystic fibrosis lung function test?

See pulmonologist. Consult physician who is pulmonologist ,physician specializing in lung diseases,for examination and advice. Xray examination of chest may be part of workup. Blood and sweat tests are also utilized. Read more...

If I have cystic fibrosis and get a lung transplant, will the disease eventually invade my new lungs?

No. The risk to the transplanted lungs are infection from bacteria left over from the old lungs, and acute and chronic rejection of the new lung by the body. Cystic fibrosis is a defect that is limited to the old lungs. Read more...
It can. Lung transplant for CF is an important life prolonging therapy but it exchanges one set of problems for another. After transplant, there is risk of rejection of the transplanted lungs by one's own immune system requiring use of strong meds that suppress your immune system which then increases your risk of serious infections. There are many facets to this - talk to your CF dr to discuss pros/cons. Read more...
Trachea still CF. The graft of new lungs does leave a trachea that still has the CF defect. This can serve as a source of infection to the new lungs. The new transplanted lungs though will not have CF disease. Read more...

Does a successful lung transplant completely get rid of the lung problems for cystic fibrosis patients?

Yes. A successful double lung transplant gets rid of pulmonary problems for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, all of the other CF issues persist (chronic sinusitis, pancreatic insufficiency, fertility issues, diabetes). The average five year survival for patients who have CF who undergo transplant is around 55-65%. Read more...
It may. Or you could trade one set of problems for another - even successful lung transplants eventually develop obliterative bronchiolitis after a period of time. Be sure that you meet some post transplant patients who are successful, and compare your quality of life to theirs - if your treatment regimen is oppressive and your lung function is bad enough, you may be better of after a transplant. Read more...
CF. A successful lung transplantation will treat CF lung disease, but not other aspects of the disease, such as sinus disease. A patient will still have cf, but typically will not have to continue their usual CF medications for the treatment of lung disease/ the sinusitis associated with CF can predispose the patient to possible infections with pseudomonas. The first year rate of success is around 90%. Read more...
Unfortunately, no. some cases of cystic fibrosis are much more serious and others – some affect the liver as well as lungs. The cystic fibrosis association warns that transplantation may add years but it is not a cure. Read more...

My child as cystic fibrosis, how likely will he get a lung infection caused by candida?

Somewhat. The main risk for candida in patients with cystic fibrosis are for those patients who take inhaled drugs (such as combined therapies - advair, symbicort (budesonide and formoterol) & Dulera or monotherapies such as asthmanex, qvar, flovent). The inhaled steroids decrease bacterial counts in the mouth and increase the risk of fungal/candidal overgrowth resulting in thrush. Read more...
Possible. Depending on your child's lung function and airway clearance compliance, the chances vary somewhat. Candidiasis is rare in pre-adult sputum culture data sent on the CF foundation, except in children with very poor lung function tests who have already had multiple other infections. Read more...
Sometimes/immunity. Candida can be associated with colonization of the airway and mouth in cf. The fungus may live in the airway without actually causing an infection. If there are inhaled drugs or medications which affect local defenses, then the candida may result in an infection. A reference for your interest is: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmed/21067323. With a lung transplantation, patients are more prone. Read more...