I have a stable L5 s1 grade 2 spondylolisthesis and it is causing me leg and back pain. Should I get a fusion surgery? Or just decompression surgery

Fusion. Decompression alone is unlikely to resolve the issue and is likely to worsen the situation in the long run. Furthermore there are now more options then just posterior fusion, an anterior approach may also be an option but a good surgical opinion or opinions are needed.
Both. A stable spondylolisthesis of a grade two with associated back and leg pain will require a decompression and arthrodesis. This should include an interbody and posterolateral fusion. Pedicle stabilization is an option especially if reduction of the anterior translation is planned. You should talk to your spinal surgeon.
See your doc. I doubt very much that most surgeons would do a decompression only in someone with a grade 2 spondylolisthesis. The reason for this is the liklihood for progression of the slippage without stabilization. I would advise getting more than one surgical opinion though.
I think the fusion. Option it address your problem much better having said that, your surgeon will be the one he in better position to advice. Good luck thank.
Fusion. The success is higher with a fusion in this case. Whether there should also be a decompression depends on the findings on clinical exam and on imaging of any significant nerve compression.

Related Questions

23m s/p l5-s1 discectomy w/ daily moderate-severe back pain & radiculopathy both leg. What is my next treatment option? More epidural? Fusion surgery?

Find out why. You shold go to see your doctor/spinal surgeon to find out why. Is there any new bulging, new tear, etc that requiring any surgical approach or is something that can be treated supportively. Something you will find from further testing. Definitely, you should have an MRI of ls done to evaluate this problem. You won;t know the treatment if you don't know the cause of the problem. Read more...
Second opinions. Are often required to provide clarity and support for, or reevaluations of, earlier recommendations. This is a complex question requiring a deeper conversation between patient and provider. Fusion may be indicated but not feasible for some, epidural may be untimely or even contraindicated for others. Face to face is best here. Read more...
Failed back. It appears that you have failed back syndrome. Please see a pain specialist for evaluation and treatment. You might benefit from additional therapy, medications, injections like epidural steroid injection or spinal cord stimulation. Read more...

Does spinal dysraphism surgery in newborn causes problems in later life. My son now 15 having pain in legs due to spondylolisthesis at l5-s1, ?

Evolving problem. Dysraphism issues vary by case & the initial surgery is focused at closing the defect while preserving as much function as possible.Open defects would be prone to invasive infection & permanent damage by germs so closing the defect affords some protection as the child grows.Spondylolisthesis & or cord tethering in later life is often seen in this patient group & relates to the original defects . Read more...
Talk to MD. This problem could have many causes. I would suggest an evaluation by a neurosurgeon. With mris and physical examination they would be able to offer a course of treatment. Read more...

Grade2 Spondylolisthesis of L5/S1. I get back pain at least once per year for a week? Does the pain mean the vertebra is further slipping forward?

Usually not. Even a spondylolisthesis that is not further shifting forward can cause episodes of back and leg pain. It is fairly uncommon (although not impossible) for it to slip further in an adult patient. If you have any concern, don't hesitate to be seen in follow up for a repeat exam and X-ray. . Read more...

I had l5-s1 spine fusion and a L4 foraminotomy in several months ago, is there a way to relieve back pain radiating down my left leg?

Several ways. Some of this depends on what part of the leg is affected and the underlying cause. Treatments include medicine, injection therapy, pt, spinal cord stimulation and further surgery. Read more...
Yes. Unless you are suffering from permanent nerve injury related to the problem you had recently treated, most pain radiating into the leg is treated well with medication, injections, or surgery (assuming a spine etiology). Once the exact location of the nerve compression is identified any number of interventions can help you. See a spine specialist to walk you through the work-up. Read more...
Post-surgical? Is this the same pain as pre-op? Or is it a new pain? Sounds like either the operation wasn't totally successful or a new problem has cropped up. Either way, see your surgeon for an opinion. Could be a new pinched nerve, a hardware issue with the fusion, or a nerve injury of some type. Is it getting better? Worse? Compare the pain to pre-op. Better or worse? All questions to discuss w/ ur surgeon. Read more...

I have scoliosis & l5-s1, does that cause back pain radiating up to neck w/ numbness & tingling in legs & arms?

Possible. It depends on severity, location, extent and associated defect of spinal cord or nerves. Read more...
Yes and no. You need to be seen by an orthopaedic spine specialist. The l5/s1 does not affect your arms but it can affect your legs. You will requires x-rays and mri's of your spine. Read more...