If I have a lump on my neck, should I be worried about head and neck cancer?

Not always. A lump in the neck can be due to infection, fatty tumor, enlarged salivary gland, and sometimes due to cancer too. A lump which continues to grow in a high-risk person (male, smoker, alcohol user, tobacco chewing, poor oral hygiene/dentition) without any signs of infection should raise concerns.
See U PCP evaluation. Although does not necessary has to be serious , but to be sure it is important to be evuated. Good lick.
It needs to be evalu. The lump could be carcinogenic or a lipoma-insignificant growth. Have your private M.D. Assess this.

Related Questions

Is head and neck cancer hereditary?

Uncommon. There can be a genetic predispostion for families to develop cancer but only a few head and neck cancers (thyroid, endorine neoplasms, neurofibromatosis and some others) are inherited. Read more...
Usually not. Head/neck cancers are typically environmentally driven- smoking, alcohol, tobacoo chewing, virus infections (hpv and ebv virus) are the causative factors. Some head/neck cancers such as thyroid cancers can be hereditary though. Read more...
No. Head and neck cancer typically refers to squamous cell cancer in the mouth/throat region and is not hereditary. More ofter associated with smoking, alcohol consumption, and hpv infection. Read more...

Who is at risk for head and neck cancer?

Variable. Patients at high risk for head/neck cancer are those with history of alcohol use, long-term smoking, tobacco chewing, human papilloma virus infection, chewing betel nuts, chronic use of ill-fitting dentures, and poor dental & oral hygiene. Read more...
SMOKERS. Smoking and drinking are the biggest risk factors for head and neck cancer. Chewing tobacco also increases the risk. Human papilloma virus is now becoming another risk factor. Read more...
Several risks. The majority of people who get squamous cell cancer of head and neck have a strong history of tobacco use (either smoking or chewing) and/or alcohol use. Certain throat cancers can be caused by a virus called hpv. There are other less common cancers that have other risk factors. The best thing you can do to reduce your risk is to eliminate tobacco use and moderate your alcohol consumption. Read more...

What are the types of head and neck cancer?

Few. Most cancers are squamous cancers from the lining of the head and neck organs. Other types include cancers of the saliva glands and other organs such as thyroid, parathyroid glands. Read more...
Many. The world health organization shows about 28 different types of salivary gland tumors, 35 thyroid gland tumors, 40 sinonasal tract tumors, about 18 larynx tumors, a dozen or more ear tumors. So -- while squamous cell carcinoma accounts for the majority of tumors, there are "hundreds" of tumor types in the head and neck. Read more...

Can there be a proper name for head and neck cancer?

No. Head and neck cancer includes all cancer that can occur in the head and neck region excluding the brain. It includes all skin cancers, lymphoma, sarcoma, sqamous cell carcinoma and many others. Read more...

Is head and neck cancer easy to treat? Can it usually be cured?

Challenge. The treatment of head and neck cancer often involves surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotheapy either alone or most often in combination. Most are managed by a multidisiplinary team consisiting of surgeons, radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, swallowing and voice therapists, social workers among others. There are many successes in the treatment of head and neck cancers these days. Read more...
Tough therapy. Head/neck cancer therapy is tough with need for surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy (one or all three). Rehab and recovery usually take 3-6 months minimum with sometimes permanent side effects. Early (stage 1-2) cancers have high cure rates; regional cancers spread to the neck have cure rates of 40-50%; cancer with distant spread is incurable though. Read more...
Depends. It depends on many things including the type of cancer, location, stage, overall health of the patient and other factors. The earlier the cancer is found, the higher the chance for a cure. In general, early head and neck cancers can be treated with surgery or radiation. Advanced cancers usually need a combination of treatments like surgery and postoperative radiation (+/- chemo) or chemoradiation. Read more...

Just found out friend has head and neck cancer so what is outcome?

It depends on stage. It can vary from excellent to poor. Neeed more info about stage and location. Read more...
Not able to predict. Cancer of head and neck is usually squamous cell carcinoma and can have survival rates in the 90% range for stage i cancers and can be incurable for stage IV cancers with distant metastasis. Overall cure rates are generally in the 60 - 70 % range for all people. Read more...
Depends. Outcomes in head and neck cancer depend on the overall stage of the cancer. Staging is dependent on tumor size, lymph nodes involved, if the tumor has spread, and other factors. Read more...

Is anyone enrolled in the multikine trial for head and neck cancer?

Be specific. What is multikine? There has to be a more exact name as multikine sounds more like a generic name, e.g. Cytokines are chemicals released in the body and when used as a pleural, it could be called/ denoted as a multikine..But that is not a proper name. So please recheck and let us know more about this term. Read more...
Check website. I believe you are asking about this trial. Please check out this website for more info and participating institutions. http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/nct01265849?term=multikine+head+and+neck;rank=1. Read more...

For what length of time can a person live with head and neck cancer?

Cancer. Life expectancy is really based on the cancer type, the amount of spread and the response to treatment given. The oncologist treating this disorder would be the best source of information in answering this question. Read more...