What is vaginal cancer?

Vaginal Cancer . Vaginal cancer occurs in several varieties and involves an unchecked proliferation of the cells lining your vaginal canal. They are typically called "adenocarcinomas." the prognosis depends on their size, location, extent of spread, and classification. Unless your mother took the des pill before you were born, your risk at your age is very small. If concerned, consult your gynecologist for an exam.
Cancer in vagina. Age > 60 yrs and exposure to the drug des - diethyl stilbestrol before birth affect a woman's risk of developing vaginal cancer. There are 2 types - squamous cell vaginal cancer spreads slowly and usually stays near the vagina, but may spread to the lungs and liver. This is the most common type of vaginal cancer. It is found most often in women aged 60 or older. Adenocarcinoma occurs in < 30 yrs.

Related Questions

What’s new in vaginal cancer research?

Several things. Scientists are learning more about tumor suppressor genes, refining radiation therapy techniques, and developing new procedures for reconstruction after surgery. Read more...
Not much right now. There are no open protocols through the gog (gynecology oncology group). Researchers are studying the role of hpv in vaginal cancer and it appears that there is some role for chemotherapy but since it is less common than ovarian and cervical cancers there is less research. Read more...

What's the prognosis of vaginal cancer?

Depends. Like most solid tumors the prognosis for your disease will depend upon the stage of the disease. The lower the stage, the less tumor there is and the more likely a good prognosis. As the stage of disease increases tumor burden increases and the less good the prognosis. Remember though that statistics are based on groups of people and do not necessarily apply to any one individual. Read more...

What about screening for vaginal cancer?

Yes! Your doctor will help you identify possible risk factors for vaginal cancer. (see my other answer for vaginal/vulvar cancer risk factors.) regular gyn examinations with pap smears as recommended are the best ways we know to screen for vaginal cancer. Read more...
Vaginal cancer.. And vulavar ancers are generally diseases of older women, but sexually active women are advised to have annual pap, and the vagina and vulva are insepcted then. Some vulvar cancers may be hpv related. Young girls and women need gardisil. Read more...
Pap smear. The pap smear screens for the same changes in the vagina or cervix. When a doctor performs a pap smear for an abnormal pap smear they look in the vagina as well as on the cervix. Read more...

If total hyst but still abnormal pap from bad HPV types, what are chances of vaginal cancer?

Low. Hpv has many types: types 16 and 18 are more biologically significant than 6 and 11. If you have had your cervix removed as part of the hystrectomy, you will not get cervical cancer. If you had dysplasia of the cervix, you can also have dysplasia of the vagina and vulva by the same hpv. A pap smear can be done of the vagina or biopsies of the vulva to exclude these possible sites. Read more...

What are the signs of vaginal cancer?

Non-healing lesion. Any vaginal lesions or sores/ulcers that are slow to heal or don't heal at all are suspicious for vaginal cancer, herpes, or an auto-immune disorder and you should be evaluated by your doctor. These areas typically bleed with intercourse or other irritation. Read more...
Vaginal cancer. Is more common in the elderly , presenting with bleeding. Younger women may have painful intercourse, dryness, bleeding, and visual change on pap. Read more...

What are the tests for vaginal cancer?

Physical and biopsy. The first step would be physical examination of the suspected lesion. A biopsy of the lesion and examination of the tissue by a pathologist are usually necessary. Read more...

What are the symptoms of vaginal cancer?

Discharge, mass. Pain, ulcer. Vaginal cancers are less common than cervical cancer. The lesions are likely to manifest by producing bloody discharge, mass and/or ulcer in the vagina, depending on the location, pain. Bleeding on intercourse may be an early sign. Read more...

What do you recommend for vaginal cancer?

Vaginal cancer. It depends on location and stage. A proximal (vaginal cuff) cancer that is stage i can be treated very well with surgery. Otherwise, chemo radiation is used unless it extends onto the vulva. Read more...

What is the prognosis of vaginal cancer? Can it spread t other areas other areas of the body?

It depends... Vaginal cancer size (of the tumor) and severity (of the changing cancer cells) play a huge role in prognosis. Pre-cancerous and early cancerous vaginal lesions are usually curable. The best bet is to catch it early, be treated by a gyn-oncologist and follow their recommendations. Read more...
Good prognosis. It likes to spread usually locally first, so it needs to be treated locally. Prognosis depends on stage and extent of disease involvement. In very advance stage it can metastasize to other organs. Read more...