Retinal surgery doctor can get rid of floaters?

Theoretically, yes. Vitrectomy can be used to eliminate floaters surgically, but carries some risks. Most significant is the risk of early cataract followed by retinal detachment and infection. I admit that these are very rare occurrences, but if the floater doesn't bother you much, why take the chance? So, it is done when benefit outweighs risk and you fully understand all the risks. So, proceed with caution.
Floaterectomy. Vitrectomy surgery is often a part of successful retinal surgery for other indications. The vitrectomy has the nice side effect that it usually takes care of floaters. Vitrectomy for floaters alone is not considered the standard of care since, besides floaters, these eyes usually see well and the risk of surgery for floaters only USUALLY does not outweigh the benefits.
Remove Floaters. A skilled vitreo-retinal surgeon can remove floaters. Floaters are caused by the natural aging process of the vitreous gel. The newest techniques of vitreous replacement still carry about a 1% risk of retinal detachment and a very high liklihood of causing cataracts. I personally have had cataract surgery followed by 25 guage vitrectomy to remove floaters which bothered me for over 50 years.

Related Questions

Does retinal surgery get rid of floaters?

Depends. There are a number of procedures that could be referred to as retinal surgery. For example retinal laser surgery to treat diabetic eye disease or a retinal tear will not eliminate a floater. A vitrectomy performed as part of a retinal or posterior segment surgery can eliminate a floater. It is best to discuss the risks, benefits, and alternatives with a retinal surgeon. Read more...
"Serious" floaters. By serious you mean interfering with vision, then the answer would be a vitrectomy. Although it carries risks, it is associated with reasonably good outcomes to get rid of floaters. The reality is that most floaters are not serious enough to warrant a vitrectomy. Of the floaters that I have seen that are truly serious, most are associated with some other disease process like diabetes. Read more...
Yes. Although vitreoretinal surgery can remove floaters, the question is should they be. Vitreous surgery is very safe, however no surgery is without risks. The benefit to risk ratio should be a big factor in whether surgery should be done. Read more...
Floaterectomy. Vitrectomy surgery is often a part of successful retinal surgery for other indications. The vitrectomy has the nice side effect that it usually takes care of floaters. Vitrectomy for floaters alone is not considered the standard of care since, besides floaters, these eyes usually see well and the risk of surgery for floaters only USUALLY does not outweigh the benefits. Read more...

I had eye floaters after I collided with my friend in school. Its bout 3 and half yrs now. So how do I get rid of this floaters? Without surgery.

Vitreous floaters. Floaters are caused by changes in the vitreous gel of the eye usually due to aging, but sometimes due to trauma as in your case. New floaters, especially those associated with light flashes need to be evaluated right away in order to make sure there is no retinal tear or detachment. Floaters that have been stable for 3 years are most likely not problematic, despite being annoying. Read more...
Difficult. Sometimes, ophthalmologists can use a yag laser to zap a floater or two. For larger more dense floaters, surgery could be used but carries risk of cataract (clouding of your natural lens) and infection. At your age, i would recommend waiting to see if the floaters clear. Read more...
No good way. Unfortunately there is no good way to get rid of floaters without surgery. When your eye doctor looks inside your eye, he/she will always see the floaters, but your brain hopefully learns to ignore them after time. There are a few doctors who will try to remove them with laser. Someday, you may be able to get a shot in your eye to remove them. But without surgery to remove them, no good way. Read more...
Floaters. Floaters are caused by the vitreous (jelly in the eye) detaching from the retina (typically a normal change in the aging eye). The vitreous clumps up or develops blurry areas within the jelly causing your floater. If when the vitreous changes, causing floaters, if the retina is torn you are at risk for a retinal detachment. You should have an examination. Tx: time, and possibly surgery. Read more...