3 doctors weighed in:

Why does the pharmacy print dosages in milliliters?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: A matter of accuracy

Medication dosage often needs precision for the illness or to make the meds last.
There is a problem using common kitchen measures to do so. If i want a kid to get 5ml of med/dose, i could write for a teaspoon, but some common teaspoons would measure out 3.5ml and some 7. Over time i could under or over medicate the patient. Millileters are easily measured by syringes or droppers & assure accuracy.

In brief: A matter of accuracy

Medication dosage often needs precision for the illness or to make the meds last.
There is a problem using common kitchen measures to do so. If i want a kid to get 5ml of med/dose, i could write for a teaspoon, but some common teaspoons would measure out 3.5ml and some 7. Over time i could under or over medicate the patient. Millileters are easily measured by syringes or droppers & assure accuracy.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Pediatrics

In brief: That's what doc said

The pharmacy ought to print the dose the way the doctor prescribed it-- if the doc wrote the instructions as "give 5 ml two times a day, " then the pharmacist should put that on the label.
Fyi, 5 ml = 5 cc = 1 teaspoon.

In brief: That's what doc said

The pharmacy ought to print the dose the way the doctor prescribed it-- if the doc wrote the instructions as "give 5 ml two times a day, " then the pharmacist should put that on the label.
Fyi, 5 ml = 5 cc = 1 teaspoon.
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Thank
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