Is generalized epilepsy progressive?

No. Epilepsy is either without known cause or related to an identifiable cause. Unknown cause may present in childhood, be easy to control, and be genetic in type. Identifiable cause is often partial type seizures and more difficult to control with association with serious medical disease. Primary generalized is usually unknown cause. Secondary generalized is usually identifiable with bad outcome.

Related Questions

Is generalized epilepsy a progressive, degenerative disorder?

Not progressive. Epilepsy is the term we use for recurrent seizures which are not caused by tumor or degenerative brain diseases. Although epilepsy may begin at any age, it usually does not worsen or cause increasing problems over time. However, a prolonged seizure can do permanent harm, so it is important to work closely with a neurologist to keep seizures well-controlled on meds which aren't causing side effects. Read more...

Can Generalized epilepsy be cured?

Controlled. It is unlikely to be cured but there are multiple effective therapies that can control your symptoms. Your neurologist can help guide you through the best options for you personally. Read more...

Is Generalized epilepsy hereditary?

Complicated. we are learning more and more each day about inherited epileptic syndromes. Conditions that lower the seizure threshold run in families. There are many different types of seizures and seizure syndromes. I cannot do service to this topic of discussion with the 400 character limit imposed. There are, in fact books written on this topic. Read more...
It can be. Epilepsy definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a family member with it, you are at increased risk compared to someone without a family history. That being said, having a family history does not guarantee you will have epilepsy. Hope this helps! Read more...
Some. there are many varieties of generalized seizrues. Some like Petit mal and febrile seizures have a high rate of familial occurrence. Others do not. The EEG pattern helps define the type of seizure which can clarify the issue. Read more...

Is primary generalized epilepsy the worst type?

No. Epilepsy is either without known cause or related to an identifiable cause. Unknown cause may present in childhood, be easy to control, and be genetic in type. Identifiable cause is often partial type seizures and more difficult to control with association with serious medical disease. Primary generalized is usually unknown cause. Secondary generalized is usually identifiable with bad outcome. Read more...
Not necessarily. Some primary generalized epilepsy syndromes are often quite easy to treat (JME for example). Some partial-onset epilepsies can be quite hard. It all depends upon the particulars. . Read more...

I would like to know why there's no scan to diagnosis abnormalities in Generalized epilepsy?

Brain is complicated. The brain is a very complicated organ. Epilepsy is when a person has repeated seizures over time. There can be many different reasons why someone has seizures. Seizures are due to abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Therefore an electroencephalogram (EEG) that detects and records electrical brain activity is use to diagnose seizures/epilepsy. Read more...
No structural lesion. There is a lowering of the seizure threshold due to an abnormality of ion channels or receptors. Many seizures that manifest clinically as a generalized tonic clonic seizure have a focal onset that is so brief or subtle that it escapes clinical detection. The EEG may show the real problem. (Onset in a location with rapid spread of abnormal electrical activity to the rest of the brain.). Read more...
Scans are Limited. Scans about creating an anatomical image. However the spacial resolution of all current scans, at their smallest scale, remains quite large/huge compared to cells. Ex: CT scan resolution down to ~1 mm pixels (i.e.1 mm squares as the smallest image elements within a calculated CT 2 dimensional image) contain millions of cells & don't see activity. Study: http://goo.gl/SsnRVP & http://goo.gl/4YdKsa. Read more...
Seizure workup. Depending on the history and physical and laboratory exam by a Neurologist, EGGs and perhaps brain scanning can be done looking for tumors, A-V malformations, etc. It is up to his judgement not routine. Read more...

Will a spect scan pick up Generalized epilepsy?

Might help. A 3-D SPECT scan is the poor man's equivalent of a PET, the former illustrating blood vessel flow patterns, and the latter, metabolic patterns. But we are dealing with anatomical variations secondary to a disorder, and with a paroxysmal process such as epilepsy, we are better off to use EEG monitoring to assess physiology. Can use ambulatory device over 24-48 hrs to seek conclusions. Read more...
SPECT SCAN. Wont pick up generalized Epilepsy unless a patient is having a seizure at the time of tracer uptake. It would not likely inform as to the type of generalized epilepsy. The clinical history and the EEG are generally more useful for diagnosing the Generalized Epilepsies. Read more...

What is the only surgery cures Generalized epilepsy?

Surgery for epilepsy. A vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment that has been approved by the FDA for "partial-onset epilepsy" but not for generalized epilepsy. Other surgeries can aim at cutting off the nerve pathways involved in the seizure or removing a part of the brain that is the souce of seizure activity. These treatment options depend on the individual and best decided in a discussion with your neurologist. Read more...

Hi, Is focal generalized epilepsy different to petit mal.

It is different. Focal epilepsy (localization-related epilepsy) is due to focal brain pathology or part of genetic syndrome or unknown cause. Many types of focal epilepsy involving different parts of the brain.Onset in adolescent or adult. Petit mal (childhood absence epilepsy) happened mostly in school age children with frequent episodes of profound impairment of consciousness or subtle changes. Consult neurology. Read more...
Focal or Generalised. In focal seizures the burst of electrical activity starts in, and stays in, one part of the brain. Therefore, you tend to have localised (focal) symptom such as muscle jerks. Petit mal is a type of generalised seizure where you have a brief loss of consciousness or awareness. There is no convulsion, you do not fall over, and it usually lasts only seconds. Absence seizures mainly occur in children. Read more...
Epilepsy. Seizures can be either generalised or focal in nature. In generalised seizures whole of body is affected where as in focal symptoms involve only a part of the body . Petit mal is also known as absence seizures which is a kind of generalised seizure. http://patient.info/health/epilepsy-a-general-introduction. Read more...
Yes. Epilepsy refers to abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Focal seizures affect a part of the brain causing symptoms in a focal part of the body (eg jerking in a limb). Generalised seizures affect the whole brain and usually result in altered consciousness +/- jerking in all limbs. Petit mal is a type of generalised seizure without jerking. Some seizures start focal then become generalised. Read more...

What are the surgeries to remove the tissue in Generalized epilepsy?

Typically... None. Since there is no area which kicks off the seizure, we can't target something to remove. Even corpus callosotomy is for partial onset with rapid spread...Not generalized. . Read more...
Seizure surgery. There are a variety of surgeries to control seizures including vagal nerve stimulation. Surgery is not an option unless medications fail to effectively reduce or eliminate the seizures. The next step is noninvasive and possibly invasive monitoring to determine a surgical option. Each case is highly specific and should be discussed with the neurologist and neurosurgeon in a team approach. Read more...