Related Questions

Causes of endometriosis after a complete hysterectomy and two laporotomys in a year and still returned, pains worse after surgerys that was 10yrs ago?

Good question! It is difficult to explain the return of your endometriosis after hyterectomy. The causes of endometriosis are not very well understood. It is possible some of your peritoneal cells may converted to endometrial cells. Or some of your residual endometriosis reactivated after a period of time. Read more...

I'm having a full hysterectomy, overies also, large cysts and endometriosis, will my wieght return to normal, I eat salad and chicken fruit only, ?

Depends. Weight gain or loss is related to the amount of energy taken in balanced with energy expended. It is common for patients to lose some weight after an operation, that returns to the preop weight after several weeks to months. Hope this answers your question. Read more...

What's worse dealing with endometriosis or hysterectomy my entire life?

If your endometriosi. Is bad enough then u may need after other measures like meds and less invasive surgery has been tried, hopefully if u have to have the hyesterec then your endometriosis will be gone or markedly lessened so u can enjoy life , bad endomtriosis is not compatible with enjoying life. Read more...

I am trying to find a dr in portland or that specializes in endometriosis. Unique situation. I have already had a hysterectomy, so not having kids.

Doctor in Portland. Hi my friend, who is an excellent GI doctor, kandice knigge is in portland. I bet her staff would be able to direct you to a good gynecologist. She is also here on health tap. Read more...

For endometriosis: will a partial hysterectomy help?

It can. In many cases yes. If the primary issue is centrally located pain with the menstrual cycle, a hysterectomy is likely to be very helpful. There are also surgical treatments short of a hysterectomy, including resection of endometriosis and pre sacral neurectomy. You need to see a good pelvic pain doctor to help you work out the best option for you. Read more...

After I had a hysterectomy, I was told that I had adenomyosis. Is that different from endometriosis?

Yes it is different. Adenomyosis is when there are glands from the lining of the uterus up inside the wall of the uterus. Endometriosis is when these cells and glands from the lining of the uterus are growing outside the uterus. Adenomyosis is a common cause of heavy periods. Read more...
Yes. Adenomyosis is where the menstrual tissue is found growing in the muscle wall of the uterus, and can be usually diagnosed only after the uterus has been surgically removed. It can cause uterine pain, heavy menstrual flow and enlarged soft doughy findings on exam. Endometriosis is where the tissue is found anywhere out side of the uterus, like pelvis (ovaries, bladder), lungs, and possible brain. Read more...
Adenomyosis. Probably all patients with endometriosis also have adenomyosis. Yet some with adenomyosis probably don't have endometriosis, acquiring it through obstetrical delivery when endometrial tissue could be forced into the muscle of the uterus due to high pressure of contractions. Many endo patients never have significant problems with adenomyosis and suppression of cycles with birth control may prevent. Read more...

What are the chances of having a hysterectomy with endometriosis? One has formed into a tumor about 5.6cm.

ZERO! You don't need a hysterectomy for endometriosis of the ovary (endometrioma). This can be: 1. Followed closely with serial ultrasounds if asyptomatic 2. Trial of ocps if marginally symptomatic 3. If having pain, then removal of the encometrioma alone (cystectomy) can be done and use Lupron (leuprolide) post-operatively 4. For fertility, debate if removal is indicated, but if 4-5cm- then would remove. Read more...

I'm 27 and I'm having a hysterectomy soon due to endometriosis. Will that put into menopause will being in menopause affect my mental health.

Ovaries too. Only if they remove your ovaries too. If they are, talk to your doctor about hormone replacement therapy, it can significantly mitigate the side effects you may experience. Read more...
Ovaries or not. You will only be in menopause if your surgeon is also planning on removing both of your ovaries. If your ovaries are not removed, you will then go into menopause when your ovaries stop functioning. The average age of natural menopause is 51 years old. Read more...
Depends. If your ovaries are removed you will be menopausal right then. If your ovaries are not removed, you will eventually go through menopause, usually around age 50. Keeping your ovaries does present the risk of persistent or recurrent pain due to the endometriosis. Read more...

Does a hysterectomy cure endometriosis? I have a lot of pain due to my endometriosis. If I have a hysterectomy, will the endometriosis be gone for good? .

Most . Most women who have a hysterectomy from endometriosis have significant relief of symptoms, because they have "endometriomas", or endometrial tissue that is in areas of the uterus where it is not supposed to be. Some women have endometriomas implant in other areas of the abdomen, these are usually looked for during the hysterectomy in this situation, and they can be ablated (or removed). Read more...
Possible. The definitive treatment for endometriosis is hysterectomy with removal of the ovaries and tubes as well as the appendix in most cases. The success rate for that treatment is about 95%. Read more...