What is the prognosis after a liver transplant?

Usually excellent. Liver transplantation should only be performed for those expected to survive at least 3 years, one of the us government's key outcome measures for transplant programs. Two categories of liver disease are generally linked to a worse prognosis because they can recur (come back) - cancer and hepatitis. Other patients should do well provided they take their medications and follow good health habits.
Depend on severity. Prognosis of liver transplant depend on risks factor, severity of the cirrhosis, age factor, levels of ascites, levels of hepatic dysfunction.
It depends on the cause of the need for liver transplant and the transplant center, but generally, 90-95% of patients are alive at 1 year, 75-85% at 2 years and 65-75% are alive at 5 years. This is much better than the life expectancy without a liver transplant.

Related Questions

What is the current prognosis after a liver transplant?

Variable. It will depend on the reason for transplant, where it was done, the patient's overall health before transplant and the health of the donor's liver. Alcoholic liver patients do very well. Patients with chronic hepatitis c that were successfully treated before transplant will do well. One year survival overall is 85% from the latest national data. Read more...
85% Survival at one yer can be up to 85% or even more depending on the cause necessitating transplant and the quality of the organ receiver. Cause of death after the first year commonly nclude medical complications or disease recurrence. Read more...

What is the average prognosis for a recipient of a live liver transplant?

Wow, that depends... ...on a lot of factors--age, co-morbidities, closeness of match between donor and recipient, rejection/graft-versus-host, underlying cause of liver failure, compliance with post-transplant protocols and follow-ups, indiscretion with intake of alcohol/tobacco/illicit drugs. You get the idea--- it's not a question that warrants a blanket response! Read more...

I have a 16 year old female friend with primary sclerosing cholangitis. If she is on the liver transplant list, what is her prognosis?

LIVER TRANSPLANT. If she is on the liver transplant list, her prognosis is guarded unless she gets a transplant. Read more...
Depends on donors. Placement on the national wait list for a deceased donor liver means that she is not expected to survive without transplantation. Her life will depend on the generosity of others who agree to donate their organs. Unfortunately there is a severe shortage with 18 deaths per day in the us. Her outlook is bright if she does get a liver in time. Read more...
Very good. Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, or psc, are among the patients who have the best long-term outcomes following liver transplantation. Young people with psc, such as your friend, do particularly well. The likelihood that she will be alive 5 years after transplant is likely greater than 80%, and there are many examples of patients like her alive 10-20 years or more after transplant. Read more...

Diagnosed with cirrhosis in 2009 taking lactulose & Lasix (furosemide) what is my prognosis without liver transplant?

Many variables. It depends on the cause of the cirrhosis (alcohol, hepatitis c, etc.), the degree of scarring and degree of inflammation (all on biopsy), serum Albumin concentration and if blood clotting tests are normal or abnormal. The cause of the cirrhosis and degree of synthetic function (albumin and clotting factors) are the most important variables. Have a long talk with your gastroenterologist. Read more...
Cirrhosis. You should be on spironolactone than lasix (furosemide). Talk to your doctor about this. The prognosis depends on each patient. Some people live long without requiring liver transplant but some people need it sooner. Read more...

I'm 22 months out liver transplant due to "cryptogenic cirrhosis" now have stage 3 fibrosis with bridging. No hepc. Lupus. Progression/prognosis?

Discuss with doc. Problems like these can only be correctly handled by your doctor in person. He/she needs to listen to you, perform an examination and possibly run labs or other tests. That's the only way he/she can find out what's going on and what to do about it. Read more...
Impossible to say. If you have stage 3 fibrosis in the new transplanted liver, that is certainly of concern. The lack of bridging (a precursor to cirrhosis) is encouraging. I am certain you have an entire transplant team available to you - these questions must be posed to your transplant doctors - surgeons, gastroenterologists and others who know your full history to get a meaningful answer, not my guessing. Read more...

CIN 1 after positive for HPV high risk 6 months ago. Immunocompromissed due Liver transplant, hbp and CKD stage 3. Prognosis and possible treatment?

Ask your doc... Please prepare a list of questions or concerns that you may have and bring it to see the doctor who has been monitoring your liver transplant, drug use, and general health since s/he should know more about your individual conditions than anyone online. To properly handle any daily health issues, follow instructions described in http://formefirst.com/eNewsletter06.html. Best wish ... Read more...