What negative health consequences are associated with cancer radiation and/or cancer surgery?

Depends on type. Cancer treatment is usually divided into local (the organ where the cancer started) and systemic (the rest of the body) therapy. Both surgery and radiation therapy are local rx's--their side effects are dependent on which organ is being treated. Which specific cancer type are you referring to?
Depends on site. The effects of radiation are totally dependant on the part of the body being treated, except mild to moderate fatigue is common to all sites. Reddening of the skin is common; nausea or diarrhea if the abdomen is treated. Burning sensation on urination if the pelvis is treated. Sore swallowing and dry cough if the chest is treated. Dry mouth and sore throat if the throat is treated.

Related Questions

What are worst side effects of cancer radiation and surgery?

Need More Info. The side effects of both surgery and radiation therapy are dependent on the specific type of cancer that is being treated. Read more...
Depends. Side effects of radiation will depend upon what area is radiated. As an example- radiation of the head and neck can lead to decreased saliva production and increased cavities; sore mouth; changes in taste; sore throat. Side effects of surgery depend upon where and what type of surgery is performed. Read more...

What is best treatment option for lung cancer...Surgery, targeted drugs or cehmo/radiation and why?

Staging. Treatment of lung cancer depends on the staging. Oncologist will decide what kind of treatment is necessary. Read more...
Sometimes only one. Sometimes all 3, but lung cancer is really several diseases depending upon the stage, and the type of cancer. The treatment tool box differs for each stage. So one of the most important pieces of information is accurately knowing the stage. A common error is misuse of the pet scan (a very useful test in general) as a substitute for biopsy, as opposed to a road MAP to knowing what to biopsy. Read more...
Personalized therapy. Will require more than 400 words to explain. Tx for lung ca is personalized, -individualized . To formulate plan - will need to know the type of lung cancer, the stage , the mollecular profiles /biology of the cancer cells, other prognostic factors , and other factors including age, overall medical condition, preferences etc. No one glove fits all. Please discuss with your oncologist. Read more...
Depends. Most important question is type (histology) of lung cancer: non-small cell vs small cell. Small cell is usually widespread and not amenable to surgery. Most common lung cancer is non-small cell. This almost always requires surgery for cure. Radiation, chemotherapy and/or biologic (targeted) treatments may be used in addition to surgery or by themselves if surgery is not possible, or if metastatic. Read more...
Depends on stage. In the medically fit individually, the standard of care upfront therapy for stage i -iib nsclc is surgery. For stage iiia either chemotherapy +/- radiation followed by surgery or chemoradiation alone. For stage iiia - iv, therapy is chemotherapy +/- radiation. Any of the chemotherapy options may be "targeted" as part of a clinical trial. For more info: http://bit.Ly/ygfoko. Read more...
Multidisciplinary. Standard of care for stage i -iib nsclc is surgery. For stage iiia either chemotherapy +/- radiation followed by surgery or chemoradiation alone. Treatment is best by multidisciplinary and individualized with a targeted approach. The patient's overall health/fitness, tumor type, and molecular/genetic specifics should be considered to formulate best approach. Read more...