What are the symptoms of GI cancer?

Bleeding, GI issues. The symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer are variable. Symptoms range from none (eg, found asymptomatically on screening colonoscopy), bleeding, abdominal pain, weight loss, etc.
Bleeding causing. Black tarry stools to bright red blood, change in bowel habit, non-specific cramping, and swaollowing problems in esoph., dyspepsia/belching in gastric. Jaundice in pancreas and epigastric pain in the upper GI cancers.

Related Questions

What are the real symptoms of GI cancer?

Which GI cancer? There are a lot of GI cancer. The symptoms will depend on the type of cancer, the location, the stage etc. Pain either from obstruction/ narrowing of the GI lumen, problems with digestion ( swallowing problem- if located at the esophagus) , weight loss, bleeding can occur. If you can be more specific you will get a better answer. Read more...
GI too broad to say. Gi goes from swallowing tube to anal aperture, and a bunch of juice squeezers along the way(pancreas, bile ducts and gall bladder). Blockage of the tubes cause nausea, vomiting, pain. Many ooze blood, but so do benign things. Colorectal blocks cause constipation. Vomiting and pooping blood should not be put off, but not always caused by cancer. Read more...

What are the causes and risk factors of GI cancer?

Causes for GI cancer. There are some genetic predispositions to them. Small intestine tumors are rare and probably missed. Colon cancer is associated to a low fiber diet, associated to colon polyps and more common in the industrialized word. Gastric cancer is more common in volcanic regions :japan, iceland, chile, c.R., smoked food intake ( nitrites) and were refrigeration of food is not adequate, and h. Pylori present. Read more...
Multiple. Stomach cancer: h. Pylori infection (kind of bacteria), alcohol, smoking, rare genetic syndromes. Pancreas: smoking, alcohol, genetic predisposition. Small bowel: none clearly established. Colon & rectum: family history. Anal: genital herpes, receptive anal intercourse, HIV positive. Read more...

I know some people are more likely to get GI cancer than others. Which ones?

Depends. There are many forms of "gi cancer." stomach cancers may be related to some smoked foods, excess alcohol use, cigarette smoking. Colon cancers may be related to high fat foods and hereditary family risks. Exercise, high fiber and low fat diet, and proper weight maintenance may help reduce intestinal cancer risks. Read more...
Many. Smokering, heavy alcohol intake, low fiber, high red meat intake and processed food, excessive caffeine intake, patients with family history of GI cancers, personal historey of inflammatory bowel disease, women with a history of breast cancer, are a few of the risk factors as well as age over 50. Read more...

How can I prevent GI cancer?

Healthy lifestyle. Maintain a healthy lifestyle: - balanced diet - achieve and maintain an ideal body weight - don't use tobacco - consume alcohol in moderation - know your family history watch for symptoms: - blood in your stool - change in stool habits - unusual abdominal pains keep up on screening tests: - colonoscopy at age 50. Read more...
Family history. All the answers above are correct. Family history may suggest genetic predisposition and should be considered. Read more...

Is there an association between stomach cancer and a GI bleed?

Yes. Stomach cancers can often erode internal blood vessels or ulcerate and bleed into the intestines. Read more...

Would an upper GI test show stomach cancer?

Endoscopy. Is preferred test for diagnosis of stomach cancer. A barium upper GI series is not as sensitive. Biopsy can also be done during endoscopy. Read more...

Will a GI cancer show up in a breast?

Not likely. Dome GI cancers can metastasize to nearly anywhere on the body but more commonly they will show up in the liver first. Read more...