5 doctors weighed in:

Why would pulse and respiratory rate increased during a severe asthma attack?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sue Ferranti
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Low oxygen...

During an asthma exacerbation the body is trying to get enough oxygen via the blood to all critical organs.
So, by increasing the respiratory rate, more oxygen can enter the body via the lungs. By increasing the heart rate, more blood can be circulated so more oxygen can be delivered. Both are compensation mechanisms the body uses to insure adequate oxygen delivery.

In brief: Low oxygen...

During an asthma exacerbation the body is trying to get enough oxygen via the blood to all critical organs.
So, by increasing the respiratory rate, more oxygen can enter the body via the lungs. By increasing the heart rate, more blood can be circulated so more oxygen can be delivered. Both are compensation mechanisms the body uses to insure adequate oxygen delivery.
Dr. Sue Ferranti
Dr. Sue Ferranti
Thank
Dr. Robin Larabee
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Compensation

During an asthma attack, oxygen is not getting into the blood as it should.
In response, the person must breathe harder and faster in attempt to make the gases in the blood their normal concentrstions. This extra breathing is a lot of work, so the heart must beat faster as well. Also, the heart must try to spread the gases around the body better, so has to pump faster.

In brief: Compensation

During an asthma attack, oxygen is not getting into the blood as it should.
In response, the person must breathe harder and faster in attempt to make the gases in the blood their normal concentrstions. This extra breathing is a lot of work, so the heart must beat faster as well. Also, the heart must try to spread the gases around the body better, so has to pump faster.
Dr. Robin Larabee
Dr. Robin Larabee
Thank
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