How do they test for pelvic congestion syndrome? Did an internal exam and based on my symptoms is how he diagnosed me. Should I go for other tests?

No good definitive. There is no good, standard, accepted test for pelvic congestion syndrome. It is basically diagnosed by excluding other possible causes of pelvic pain. Some doctors believe an MRI or CT scan can show dilation of the pelvic vessels but the data proving this is kind of weak. Mirena (levonorgestrel) IUDs and birth control pills can usually improve symptoms.

Related Questions

My doctor believes I have pelvic congestion syndrome. What is this? Is this rare, or common. Want some advice on this?

Rare. And a diagnosis of exclusion when a multitude of tests point nowhere in particular. Find a pelvic pain specialist in a university hospital in your area for best results. Read more...
Not so simple. Dilated ovarian/uterine veins become engorged with blood causing pain. Female, usually have had multiple pregnancies. Ultrasound/mri findings supporting the diagnosis. It is not a diagnosis of exclusion. It is real. Likely under diagnosed and under treated. The gold standard is mri/mrv, if present the veins are treated much like varicose veins can be. Ask to see an interventional radiologist. Read more...

What is typical care routine for pelvic congestion syndrome 28 yr old female?

Many. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, suppression of ovarian function with hormaones, osteopathic manipulation and alternative therapies such as acupuncture and physical therapy. Also embolization has shown significant benefit. Seek advice from your primary provider or gyn. Read more...
Varies on severity. There is not really any "typical" therapy for pelvic congestion syndrome. Occasionally diuretics, anti-inflammatories can help. Use of ovarian vein coil placement or embolization by a radiologist can help. Some women improve with hysterectomy but we dont usually recommend that as a first line of treatment. Read more...
Varied. Depends on severity of symptoms. I perform embolization of the abnormal veins that cause pcs. Check out this topic on www.Sirweb.Org for good discussion. Read more...
Depends. That depends on how the diagnosis has been made. Chronic pelvic pain can have many causes. If the patient has a confident diagnosis of ovarian vein insufficiency the best treatment currently available is embolization. This is performed by an interventional radiologist, and a consultation with an ir who is experienced with this disease would be helpful. Read more...

My question is I had endometriosis and pelvic congestion syndrome with a full hysterectomy and the doctors were pushing me out that day do you normally stay overnight with a full hysterectomy I feel the doctors did not treat me right?

More & more. hysterectomies are done as outpatients. An article. study entitled "Feasibility and Safety of Outpatient Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy" concluded "Same-day discharge is a feasible and safe option for carefully selected patients who undergo an uncomplicated TLH, even in the presence of leiomyomas, severe adhesions, or endometriosis." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4354205/ >> Read more...

Can tubal ligation cause pelvic congestion syndrome? Used filshie clips

Short answer: Yes. If your symptoms began within days to weeks following ligation, and no other findings exist on regular workup, you may have a variant of Post-Tubal Ligation Syndrome. You should seek out an expert on Chronic Pelvic Pain. Reversal of the ligation is sometimes possible and your symptoms may subside. Go to Facebook: The New PTLS private Support Group. Read more...

Would pelvic congestion syndrome affect kidney function?

No. Pelvic congestion syndrome is a waste basket term for pelvic pain /discomfort which is chronic.Kidney function should not be affected by this syndrome. Read more...

How does pcs cause back pain? I have been diagnosed with pelvic congestion syndrome but I don't understand how that can be the cause of my recurrent back pain that is similar to (but not exactly) sciatica and sacral iliitis. Can you explain what's going

Pelvic . Pelvic congestion syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, meaning typically your doctor will investigate common causes of pelvic pain first. It can be a difficult diagnosis to make. True pelvic congestion syndrome is a problem that causes pelvic pain that is not fixed in one area (it may hurt on the left side one day and on the right side another day). It is usually made worse by prolonged standing, and causes pain during and after intercourse. It is caused by dilation of blood vessels in the pelvis. The vessels by become dilated as a result to being compressed by an enlarged uterus that has shifted inappropriately, a fibroid or from compression by the pelvic muscles. The causes the blood in the veins to be stagnant and does not move back to the heart quickly. The distension of the vessels from compression causes pain. It can be diagnosed on ultrasound, ct scan, MRI or during surgery. If the pain is truly from the pelvis, it may be caused by other problems such as adenomyosis (thickening of the uterine muscle or something else such as endometriosis. A hysterectomy can improve pain from pelvic congestion and other problems related to the pelvis. For women who have chronic pelvic pain that are done with child bearing, a hysterectomy may be helpful. Read more...
See Specialist. Consider imaging studies for your spine if you believe your pain is sciatica or sacra-iliac in origin. Pelvic congestion syndrome can mimic sciatica occasionally but it is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, meaning everything else has been ruled out first. Read more...