What is treatment for thyroid cancer?

Surgery. A surgery named total thyroidectomy is the mainstay of therapy for thyroid cancer. This may be done with or without a central neck dissection depending on your particular surgeon's prefrences and how aggressive your particular thyroid cancer may be. After surgery depending on multiple factors you may or may not receive radioactive iodine ablation.
Thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer is one of the most treatable cancers. The treatment is a combination of thyroid surgery, radioactive iodine and thyroid hormone therapy. Some patients need only surgery and other with metastatic disease need all 3 treatments. Some very aggressive tumors fail these 3 treatments and can be treated with "tyrosine kinase inhibitors".

Related Questions

What is the treatment of thyroid cancer?  

Surgery. Thyroid cancer is treated surgically by removal of all the thyroid or a portion of the thyroid. After surgery, patients at higher risk of recurrence or with more aggressive cancers may be treated with radioactive iodine. Rarely, external radiation or chemotherapy is added in very severe cases. Read more...
Surgery. Surgery is the most critical part of management for thyroid cancer and is the mainstay of treatment. As such it is quite important to pick a surgeon with extensive experience treating thyroid cancer. Usually surgery is followed by radioactive iodine ablation depending on the extent of disease. Read more...

What is the best treatment after thyroid cancer?

It depends. It depends on the type of thyroid cancer and the treatment you've had so far. Usually, you need treatment with thyroid hormone to suppress any remaining gland and replace missing thyroid hormone. You will need to be followed with blood tests. Occasionally, you may require other therapy. Many types of thyroid cancer just need surgery. . Read more...
Depends entirely. upon the type of thyroid cancer and extent of previous treatment. Assuming that it is papillary cancer, the most common type, and that you already had surgery and radiation, the most common form of treatment, you need to be on thyroid replacement meds. You should also get an imaging study to make sure that all of the cancer has been removed. Talk to your doctor about proper follow up. Read more...

How will treatment for thyroid cancer affect my normal activities?

Depends. It depends on the type of treatment and the extend of your cancer. In the more common cases, once you have recovered from your surgery and take the correct dose of thyroid replacement, you should be able to maintain normal activities. Read more...
Depends on treatment. Thyroidectomy is the first treatment. There can be low calcium levels and thyroid level that have symptoms but can be replaced by pills. If the cancer is small then no other therapy. Others may need radioactive iodine and there will be radiation rules to follow and avoid exposure to others. Read more...

Can I have a baby after treatment for thyroid cancer?

You can.. Treatment for localized disease is surgery. In certain cases, radioiodine tx is given post-op for differentiated thyroid ca. If you are cured- yes you can have a baby providing you dont have other problems that prevent you from becoming pregnant.Pregnancy should be delayed for at least 6 months from radioiodine tx to ensure that thyroid hormone levels normalized and that additional tx not needed. Read more...
Likely. It depends on the type, stage of cancer, treatment given, your age and general health. In general there is no medical reason that you could not get pregnant because you had thyroid cancer. Read more...

Best treatment for thyroid cancer? Is it better to just take out the side of the thyroid with the cancer or get rid of the whole thing? If you keep part of your thyroid, could that get cancer later? If I get rid of the whole thing, which is better: radioa

The . The best treatment for thyroid cancer is dependent on a number of factors. The most common thyroid cancers are papillary thyroid carcinoma (>80%) and follicular thyroid ca (~15%). Treatment is dependent on low risk vs. High risk tumors. Low risk is age <45, female, mass is < 2cm, no evidence of metastatic spread (lymph nodes in the neck or further); and on pathology there is no evidence of metastaic spread, spread outside the lining of the thyroid, no cancer at the margins of the resection, no invasion of nerves or blood vessels, only one spot of cancer found in the thyroid. With low risk tumors it may be possible to do a hemithyroidectomy, only remove the half with the cancer. If the pathologist finds other high risk features then you may have to go back to the operating room to remove the other half. Removal of the whole thing allows for better surveillance, allows for radioactive iodine therapy, and it removes the risk of the other side being affected--papillary thyroid cancer can be on both sides. Doing both sides increases risks of surgery--both nerves to the voice box are at risk and there is a risk of low calcium. The number one treatment for thyroid cancer is surgery. It would then be determined if radioactive iodine therapy is needed. Except in very rare cases (people who are too unhealthy to tolerate surgery), radioactive iodine is not the first or only therapy for thyroid cancer. Read more...
Hemithyroidectomy. If the cancer can be removed by "hemi"thyroidectomy, go for it. The likelihood of getting a thyroid cancer in the remnant is low, and without a thyorid you will betaking pills the rest of your life. As for getting rid of the whole thing, surgery is probably a bit better than radioablation, although if radioablation fails you can always do surgery later. We can predict how well RA will work. Read more...

I recieved rai treatment for thyroid cancer in april 2013. Can I start trying to have a baby now, 6 months later?

Check w/your doctor. There are a variety of factors that need to be looked at. Considering the rai, it is generally stated that you should wait one full year before conceiving, but there is absolutely no scientific data showing you need to wait that long. It's all anecdotal and been passed along from one generation of doctors to the next. Read more...

How safe is external-beam radiation treatment for thyroid cancer?

Not common treatment. External beam radiation is seldom used for thyroid cancer. Usual treatment is surgery, radioactive iodine, and supressive doses of synthroid (thyroxine). However, ext beam rt can be used when there is extensive disease, unresectable disease, or for additional targeting of local tumor; maybe bone metastases. There are side effects, but usually there is advanced disease, and the treatment is needed. Read more...
Unusual. In most cases, external beam should be considered only if i-131 and surgery have failed. Targeting a single brain or bone lesion with external beam can be done, usually with limited side effects, but the goal is usually not for cure in those cases. Depending on the specifics, some thought should be given to a tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a third-line treatment. Read more...
Very much so. Indications for external beam radiation for thyroid cancer are if there was a positive margin after resection, lymph nodes involved at time of resection, or progression in spite of other treatments. Usually it will involve the supraclav node region and possibly the thyroid bed. This can cause temporary irritation of the throat or nerves controlling your arm. Skin irritation can occur as well. Read more...

What to do if I have external-beam radiation treatment for thyroid cancer?

Follow. The treatment for a primary thyroid malignancy is surgical resection. Radiation is employed if after a lymph node resection there is a question of any residual cancer cells. RAI is employed if there is residual thyroid tissue or remnant of thyroid Ca where the iodine localizes in remaining tissue. External beam is used for cells left behind in neck. Follow up exam and scans needed. Read more...