What the difference between a pulmonary edema and pulmonary embolism?

Difference... Pulmonary edema is excess fluid in the lungs whereas pulmonary embolus is a blood clot in the pulmonary vascular system. They are very different but a pulmonary embolus is one of the many, many causes of pulmonary edema.
Clot verus fluid. A pulmonary embolism is when a blood clot usually from the vein in the legs/ pelvis breaks off and lodges in the pulmonary arteries. This causes a strain on the right ventricle ( the part of the heart that pumps blood to the lung, along with several other problems. Pulmonary edema is fluid build up in the lungs, usually from heart failure but there are other causes. Symptoms can overlap.

Related Questions

What is the difference between a pulmonary edema and a pulmonary embolism?

Fluid vs Clot. Pulmonary edema is a swelling and fluid accumulation in the lung tissue. A pulmonary embolism is a clot that has travelled (usually) from the legs, through the blood stream, and lodged in the circulation of the lung. Read more...
Another thought. The formation of a clot in the lung may originate in the lung as well. If there is underlying lung disease or cardiac disease, then these are risk factors potentially for the formation of an embolism. Read more...

Is pulmonary edema and pulmonary embolism one and the same?

No. Pulmonary embolus is a blood clot (in the venous system) that travels to the lungs and inhibits blood flow into the lungs. Pulmonary edema is fluid accumulation in the lung parenchyma (lung tissue), it has may causes but the most common is congestive heart failure (chf). Read more...
No. Pe pulmonary embolism is a clot from elsewhere (pelvic or leg veins more commonly) migrating through the main veins and caught into the lung which are like big filters. Pulmonary edema is with heart failure, fluid retention, lung congestion with fluid edema and may follow heart attack, valvular heart disease and a variety of conditions. Both cause shortness of breath and can be deadly. Read more...

Are pulmonary edema and a pulmonary embolism the same?

No. Pulmonary edema refers to fluid in the lungs, most commonly as a result of a failing heart. Pulmonary emboli are blood clots that form somewhere in the body (usually the legs) and travel to the lungs. Read more...
No. The lung's job is to bring oxygen to blood and remove carbon dioxide from blood. The blood supply is the pulmonary artery. If there is a plug (embolism) in that artery, the blood cannot reach oxygen-rich lung, causing "dead space." with edema, the lung is flooded with fluid so oxygen is blocked from reaching artery, causing "shunt." basically, edema is a lung problem, embolism is vessel problem. Read more...
No they are not. Pulmonary edema is "fluid" inside your lungs. This is usually caused by disfunction of the left side of the heart. Pulmonary emboli is a blood clott in the blood vessels of your lung. The problem is that clinically, the patient may feel the same symptoms of dyspnea, tiredness, fatigue, cough. Chest pain and unilateral peripheral edema tends to be associated more with pulmonary emboli. Read more...
Pulm edema vs PE. No pulmonary edema is in essence water in the lungs, pulmonary emboli is clots. Read more...

Patient with pulmonary embolism one week ago now she developed pitting edema in her both leg only without any other abnormality so what is the cause?

Pulm hypertension. After a pulmonary embolism, (blood clot in the lungs) there can be high blood pressure in the lungs, (pulmonary hypertension) causing the blood to back up into the leg veins. An echocardiogram could help to find this out. Blood clots in legs is possible, but less likely since both legs are involved. A blockage of the veins in the pelvis is possible too. You should see your doctor about this soon. . Read more...

What is the difference between septic embolisms in the lungs and a pulmonary embolism?

Bacteria. Emboli are stuff (most commonly clots) that move from somewhere to somewhere else down a blood vessel, in this case from clots in veins of the body, down to the heart, and through its right side to the lungs, where they can block blood flow to these organs. Septic emboli are stuff that also has bacteria inside, and therefore can cause further infection in the lungs, and even greater damage. Read more...

Difference between pulmonary embolism and heart attack?

Vast. Pulmonary embolism is the blockage of the pulmonary artery branches by clot, most commonly from the legs. Causes lung dysfunction and heart failure sometimes death. Heart attack (myocardial infarction) is the result of a blockage of the coronary (heart) artery with resultant death of a portion of the heart muscle. Result is heart dysfunction/failure/arrest and even death. Read more...
Completely different. Both may cause similar chest pain. Pulmonary embolism is a clot in the lung circulation. Heart attack is a clot in the coronary circulation. They can be differentiated by the tests like ECG or ct scan. Read more...

How to know if you have a pulmonary embolism? I think I have a calf sprain. What's the major differences and sign you need to see a dr.

Positive Chest CT. If you present with possible signs of pe (shortness of breath, rapid pulse, chest pain, etc) a ct scan of the chest with contrast will frequently be done to confirm the diagnosis of pe. Then you would know. A calf "sprain" could be clots in the leg veins but only infrequently progress to a pe. Read more...

How to tell if it's deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism? What are the major differences?

Can be the same. In some patients a DVT leads to pe. In other patient they have one or the other. A DVT is a clot in the deep veins such as the legs, or veins in the pelvis with associated swelling of the legs. A pe is clot in the pulmonary artery in the lung and could be associated with chest pain, shortness of breath, passing out as well as coughing or wheezing. Read more...
Multiple . Dvt deep vein thrombus is in deep veins of arms, pelvis or legs. Rarely intra cardiac. Pulmonary embolism is a thrombus that moves from somewhere to the lungs. Read more...