What is the treatment of thyroid cancer?  

Surgery. Thyroid cancer is treated surgically by removal of all the thyroid or a portion of the thyroid. After surgery, patients at higher risk of recurrence or with more aggressive cancers may be treated with radioactive iodine. Rarely, external radiation or chemotherapy is added in very severe cases.
Surgery. Surgery is the most critical part of management for thyroid cancer and is the mainstay of treatment. As such it is quite important to pick a surgeon with extensive experience treating thyroid cancer. Usually surgery is followed by radioactive iodine ablation depending on the extent of disease.

Related Questions

What is treatment for thyroid cancer?

Surgery. A surgery named total thyroidectomy is the mainstay of therapy for thyroid cancer. This may be done with or without a central neck dissection depending on your particular surgeon's prefrences and how aggressive your particular thyroid cancer may be. After surgery depending on multiple factors you may or may not receive radioactive iodine ablation. Read more...
Thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer is one of the most treatable cancers. The treatment is a combination of thyroid surgery, radioactive iodine and thyroid hormone therapy. Some patients need only surgery and other with metastatic disease need all 3 treatments. Some very aggressive tumors fail these 3 treatments and can be treated with "tyrosine kinase inhibitors". Read more...

What is the best treatment after thyroid cancer?

It depends. It depends on the type of thyroid cancer and the treatment you've had so far. Usually, you need treatment with thyroid hormone to suppress any remaining gland and replace missing thyroid hormone. You will need to be followed with blood tests. Occasionally, you may require other therapy. Many types of thyroid cancer just need surgery. . Read more...
Depends entirely. upon the type of thyroid cancer and extent of previous treatment. Assuming that it is papillary cancer, the most common type, and that you already had surgery and radiation, the most common form of treatment, you need to be on thyroid replacement meds. You should also get an imaging study to make sure that all of the cancer has been removed. Talk to your doctor about proper follow up. Read more...

I have to be isolated after radiation treatment of thyroid cancer? What do I do?

Just chill. I think this is mostly done out of fear of tort liability. Folks are scared of radiation - and rightly so, but I don't think you're really a danger to anyone. Congratulations on having your disease diagnosed and effectively treated. Best wishes for a happy and cancer-free future. Read more...

What is thyroid cancer? Is treatment possible?

Lesion in thyroid. Carcinoma of the thyroid not uncommon and presenting with a solitary lesion. If lesion cold on scan and solitary resection necessary. There is a 30%+ rate of conversion to malignancy of the solitary adenoma. The lesions present as a papillary or follicular carcinoma when fully transformed. Total lobectomy or thyroidectomy needed depending on size of lesion, age of patient and nodal status. Read more...

Are there any choices in thyroid cancer treatment?

Yes. Nutrition improves healing of ulcer - protein supplementation esp arginine, citrulline helps in addition give zinc, vit c, multivitamin, vitamin k2. Read more...
Two basic. The primary treatment for thyroid cancer (papillary and follicular) is surgical resection, either hemithyroidectomy or total thyroidectomy. Depending on the size of the tumor, radioactive iodine treatment (i131) may be indicated. Read more...

What is thyroid cancer and their treatment if possible?

Malignant tumor. Malignant tumor of thyroid gland. In usa, thyroid carcimoma comprises appr. 1% of all cancers and accoints for 0.2% of cancer deaths. Most of these cancers are of the papillary type. These common tumors tend to be biologically indolent and have excellent prognosis. Papillary carcinoma can occur at any age and rarely has been diagnosed as a congenital tumor. Treatmen-total or partial thyroidectomy. Read more...
Several types. Most thyroid cancer is called papillary (80%). Treatment requires surgery followed usually be radioactive iodine--success is excellent. Follicular cancer is next (15-20%). Same treatment and success is also very good, but more variable. Medullary is harder, takes more surgery and iodine does not help. It is rarer--5%. Anaplastic is very dangerous and rarer still--especially in young people. Read more...

How will treatment for thyroid cancer affect my normal activities?

Depends. It depends on the type of treatment and the extend of your cancer. In the more common cases, once you have recovered from your surgery and take the correct dose of thyroid replacement, you should be able to maintain normal activities. Read more...
Depends on treatment. Thyroidectomy is the first treatment. There can be low calcium levels and thyroid level that have symptoms but can be replaced by pills. If the cancer is small then no other therapy. Others may need radioactive iodine and there will be radiation rules to follow and avoid exposure to others. Read more...

If you have a thyroid cancer 20% but if remove already & the right also it remove we need to treatment now?

Need more data. Hi. Whether or not to follow surgical thyroidectomy with high dose radioactive iodine (RAI) depends on the size of the cancer, not the "%", whatever that refers to. I trust you're being seen by an endocrinologist. She/he will tell you if adjunctive therapy with RAI is indicated, based on tumor size (and can be influenced by pathological characteristics). Good luck! Read more...

If you have a thyroid cancer 20% but if remove already & the right also it remove how stage of cancer you have in your body and we need to treatment?

Stage. Hi. Given your age, regardless of tumor size or local spread in neck, if you have no distant metastases (e.g., lungs or bone), it's Stage 1. If you have distant metastases, it's stage 2. It would help to know if your cancer was papillary or follicular or one of the less common thyroid cancers. Good luck! Read more...