What is the difference between a pediatric oncologist and a pediatric oncology nurse?

Training. The oncologist is a physician, the other a nurse. Difference is years and type of training.
Different functions. But on the same team. The pediatric oncologist is a physician who leads the team, prescribes the chemo and marshals the plan. It is often the pediatric oncology nurse's job to coordinate that plan and see it successfully executed. Unless the pediatric oncology nurse is a nurse practitioner, he may not prescribe, although he can administer. His input to your child's care can be most important!
Doctor and nurse. Pediatric oncologists are doctors (4 years of medical school after college) with training in pediatrics (3 year residency after medical school) and pediatric hematology/oncology (3 year fellowship after residency). Pediatric oncology nurses usually have 4 years of college (some 2 years, some master degrees with 6 years).

Related Questions

What is the difference between an oncologist and a pediatric oncology doctor?

Patient age. Medical oncologists are internists that treat cancer in adults. Pediatric oncologists are pediatricians that specialize in the cancers of childhood. The diseases and their treatments are actually quite different in adults versus children. Read more...
Training and age. They are kind of 2 fields. Pediatric oncology is only for children and teens and has special challenges. Most medical oncologists see only adults. Read more...
Adult versus Child. Adult oncologists take internal medicine residency training after medical school. They then do a fellowship in adult oncology. Pediatric hematologist/oncologists take pediatric residency training followed by pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship training. Read more...

How can I go about becoming a pediatric oncology nurse practitioner?

Training. after RN degree you should have training in pediatrics oncology department in cancer center for pediatrics. Read more...

Where can I go to talk to a pediatric oncology nurse!?

Ped onc office/hosp. You can find them at the pediatruc oncology offices or at the oncology ward/unit at the children;s hospital. Read more...
Peds Onc Nurse. Most large pediatric centers in the country treat children with cancer. To find the closest member of the children's oncology group, go to http://www.Childrensoncologygroup.Org/index.Php/locations/ these centers will have pediatric oncology nurses. Read more...
Children's hospitals. A Children's Hospital. As you live in Columbus, OH, you are fortunate to have Nationwide Children's Hospital in your city. Read more...

Is it possible to start off as a pediatric oncology nurse and work your way up to a doctor?

Medical School. Regardless of your background in order to become a physician you will need to complete medical school and post-graduate training. Although having a background of being a pediatric oncology nurse will likely make some aspects of the training a bit easier there won't be any shortcuts in the training needed. Read more...
PedsOnc nurse to doc. Yes. You would need to go to medical school (4 years), complete a general pediatric residency (3 years), and then a pediatric hematology/oncology subspecialty fellowship (3 years). You would have a unique perspective starting your career as a nurse. Other less lengthy options would be to become a nurse practitioner or physician's assistance, both of which are important positions in peds onc. Read more...
Not usually. Educational pathways for nurses and physicians are distinct with no overlap after lower division college. A pediatric oncology nurse would have to complete college courses to qualify for medical school, get in and complete medical school (4 years), complete pediatric residency (3 years) and complete pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship (3 years). Read more...
Would need to go. to medical school to get a medical degree to become a doctor. Read more...

Please help me? What is a pediatric oncology nurse?

Special nurse. The pediatric oncology nurse is a nurse that provides care for childhood cancer patients and children with blood conditions. Many have special training and certification from the association of pediatric hematology/oncology nurses. In my role as a pediatric hematologist-oncologist, i find their skill and expertise important to our success of treating children and their families successfully. Read more...

What to do if I want to become a pediatric oncology nurse?

Good. First you go nursing school, after graduation work for some time in med-surg-ped nursing for some time , after acquiring sufficient paediatric nursing skills, work in ped oncology to become paediatric oncology good luck. Read more...
Get nursing license. Obtain a RN and / or BSN degree in college studying nursing. After obtaining degree and obtaining state licensure, seeking work in a children's hospital pediatric hematology/oncology unit would be the next step. Read more...

Can there be such a thing as a pediatric oncology nurse?

Yes if you work. Yes if you work in paediatric oncology department and devote to paediatric oncology , and get trained as a paediatric nurse with special skills in oncology. Read more...
Absolutely. These nurses are trained specifically to give chemotherapy to kids. They are also good at accessing ports, which are the long-term IV access that most kids have. They also become quite close to the kids during their treatment course. Read more...

What are the steps to being a pediatric oncology nurse?

First obtain RN... You must first become a registered nurse (rn). Then, applying to pediatric hospital that cares for kids with cancer can give you on the job training. See http://www.Wisegeek.Com/how-do-i-become-a-pediatric-oncology-nurse.Htm for a decent overview of the process. Good luck! Read more...
Become nurse. Graduate from a nursing program with rn or rn/bsn degree. Obtain training in pediatric oncology, either through formal training or by on-the-job training. There is nursing certification in pediatric hematology/oncology available through the association of pediatric hematology/oncology nurses. Read more...