Where can I find out about clinical trials for breast cancer?

Clinicaltrials.gov. Searching on the web, clinicaltrials.Gov is a good source.
NIH website. You can search for clinical trials on the national cancer institute website at http://www.Cancer.Gov/clinicaltrials/search or you should ask your health care provider which clinical trials would be open to you.

Related Questions

What are the benefits of a clinical trial for breast cancer? Are clinical trials for breast cancer drugs a viable way to seek treatment? .

May help. Enertering into a clinical trial you may be able to use a newer treatment, you will receive regular testing & evaluation as directed by the research protocol, and you can help further research and possibly help others in the future. See this susan g komen site: http://ww5.Komen.Org/breastcancer/clinicaltrials.Html. Read more...

Gene expression profiling predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer?

We're Getting There. In the past, we used anatomic staging alone (tumor size, lymph node involvement) to guide rx. Gene profiling allows us a completely separate measure of prognosis, and, more importantly, can predict who may or may not benefit from different chemotherapy agents. In the future, we will hopefully be able to tailor our rx to the specific cancer being treated: the elusive personalized medicine. Read more...

How can I find trials? How do you find out about test trials for breast cancer treatment?

One . One of the first steps a patient should take when trying to find a clinical trial for breast cancer is to speak to her physician regarding whether she might be a good candidate for a clinical trial. The type of trial she could be enrolled in will be determined by the extent of her disease, her physical condition, and previous treatment. There may be available trials at the patient's own medical institution. If not, one of the most comprehensive resources available is the national cancer institute's website - http://www.Cancer.Gov/clinicaltrials/search. The patient is asked to answer a few short questions online about her cancer and where she lives, and then a list of available trials in her general locale is immediately displayed. She can then show this list to her physician to clarify whether any of the trials is appropriate for her. Read more...
NCI. Seek care at a national cancer institute designated comprehensive cancer center. This will give you the best access to available clinical trials. Another option is to go to the website www.Cancer.Gov and click in the clinical trial link! Read more...
Ask. Either ask your treating physicians or you can look here: http://www.Cancer.Gov/clinicaltrials/results/type/breast. Read more...

What are the chances of survival for a woman with stage three c breast cancer?

See below. By statistical alone, realizing each person responds to treatments differently, the national cancer data base describes a nearly 50% survival over 5 years. But, each individual person is different. Read more...
Around 50% at 5 year. Stage iiic reflects patients who have aggressive lymph node disease. They cannot realistically be cured with surgery alone. Nevertheless, about 50% of women diagnosed in 2002 survived 5 years according to national cancer database statistics. Prognosis may be even better today as treatment of each patient is more specifically targeted on the basis of the biology of these aggressive tumors. Read more...

AFTER taxol/A/C for breast cancer stage2, path result-Lympho vascular invasion-shouldn't chemo resolved this? What now?

Ask your oncologist! You need to givel us more information...Did the tumor shrink on chemotherapy? How much. shrinkage? If the tumor did not shrink much, that is a bad sign. But if it reduced in size substantially then you are on the right track. But your oncologist can address your questions and guide you better. Read more...

Can men develop breast cancer?

Yes. Though not as common as women, men can also develop breast cancer. Of all breast cancers diagnosed in the United States each year, 1% are diagnosed in men. Read more...
Yes. Breast cancer is much more rare in men than women, with a lifetime risk of app. 1:100, 000. Risk factors in men include a strong family history, gynecomastia, or high estrogen levels as sometimes seen in men with liver disease. Read more...
Yes. Male breast cancer accounts for 1% of all breast cancers. The same treatments used for women are used for men. Read more...