Can you tell me how to know if I am at risk for breast cancer?

Every woman is! We really don't know what causes breast cancer. We do know that women with a long exposure to estrogen are at a higher risk. If you started your period early, or never got pregnant, or have a family history of breast cancer, your risk is higher. Radiation exposure to the chest wall (from cancer treatment) increases your risk. Alcohol intake increases your risk. So does aging. We're all at risk!

Related Questions

How to tell if I am at risk for breast cancer?

Cancer risk factors. Include: being female, ^'ing age, genetics, family history of breast cancer, previous breast cancer, being caucasian, dense breast tissue, some previous benign breast conditions, never having given birth or 1st child after age 30, early menarche, late menopause, radiation (chest), exposure to diethylstilbestrol, hormone replacement after menopause, oral contraceptives, obesity, heavy etoh use. Read more...

How to know if I am at risk for breast cancer?

Most everyone is,.. ...Even men. Your risk depends on several personal factors (like age at menopause, age at first birth, alcohol intake, bmi, and others) as well as family history. See your family doc or gyn for this and ask if you should see a specialist in risk assessment. In the meantime, live healthy and get your screening tests on time. Read more...

Who is most at risk for breast cancer?

Women. A woman in the us has a 1:8 lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, so no one is immune. This risk increases with each passing decade and is higher amongst women with a strong family history. Every woman in the us should begin to get yearly mammograms beginning at age 40: mammograms save lives. Read more...
See full answer. Brca gene mutation, family history, esp. A first-degree relative (mother, father or sister), early age at first period, late menopause, no children or children after age 30, obesity, high-fat diet. However it is very important to realize that there is no guaranteed method of prevention, and 75% of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients have no family history of breast cancer - everyone is at risk. Read more...
Family History. Those women mutations in either the brca1 or 2 genes. These patients have an 80% chance of developing breast cancer. Read more...

Who are the people at risk for breast cancer?

Every woman. Considering the fact that 1 in 8 us women will get breast ca in their lifetime, no woman should think they are immune. Certainly, women with first-degree relatives with breast ca may be at increased risk. Breast ca is also associated with women who have had elevated unopposed estrogen levels, ie, early menarche, late menopause, no prior children, long history of birth control pills/hormone rep. Read more...
Women. Women are at risk of developing breast cancer simply by being women. Other factors such as family history, hormone use, nulliparity, genetic predisposition also play a role in breast cancer risk. Read more...

Can you tell me how to know if you have breast cancer?

Get evaluated to. Know. Breast cancer sx’s can include a mass. Masses that are painless, irregular ; hard are more suggestive of cancer but they can also be tender, painful ; soft. Swelling of breast; thickened, red, skin; non-milky nipple discharge; new retraction of nipple, puckering or irritation of skin or pain ; sometimes swollen lymph nodes under arm(s). Seek med eval if you have suspicious symptoms. Read more...

Has anyone had or heard of a genetic test you can have to see if you are at risk for breast cancer?

BRCA Testing. The brca test is a simple blood test that can determine if someone carries a mutation that puts them at high risk for developing breast and/or ovarian cancer. In general, we advise testing the member of the family who had cancer first & then testing others who want the test only if a mutation was found. Remember:most breast cancers are not hereditary. Check link in comments to see if you qualify. Read more...
BrCA 1 and 2. We can test forcertaintypes of hereditary breast cancer caused by the brca genes 1 and 2. There is also a test for lynch syndrome that causes increased risk of polyposis colorectal cancer, breast, and uterine cancer. Tests are available for li fraumeni which is very rare. We think that more (and cheaper) genetic testing will be available in the next several years. Read more...

Would multiple multi-phase protocol hd chest cts several months apart impose too much radiation hazard if patient is already at risk for breast cancer?

Caution . We are now trying to avoid ordering too many ct scans in high risk patients and the concern is real. Read more...
Depends. Studies have documented a certain yet low risk of breast cancer to the use of diagnostic xray based imaging. The risk depends on age of the patient and the amount (or dose) of exposure. You and your doctor should discuss this risk versus the possible benefit to your current health issues for which these ct scans are being considered. The radiologist performing the ct's will know the dose. Read more...

If negative for brca gene, yet father had prostate cancer, is his daughter still at risk for breast cancer? I heard they were linked.

BRCA gene links. A family history of breast ovarian or colon cancer can predispose future genetic progeny if the BRCA is positive. I am unaware of a negative BRCA link to prostate cancer in males producing breast cancer in the female progeny. Read more...
Not elevated risk. In families who DO have a BRCA mutation, the breast and prostate cancers can be linked. However both are very common cancers, so they can be seen within families even if BRCA negative. The average lifetime risk of breast cancer for any given woman is 12.5%. You can do a search for the Gail Risk Model to get a little better idea of your own personal risk. Read more...

Can I tell me if I am at high risk for breast cancer but don't have it, would the surgery be completely out of pocket?

Good question. Depends on your insurance and what you consider "high risk". For example, a patient with a brca mutation usually can get preventative mastectomies covered. Your doc could consider sending you to a specialist in risk assessment who will estimate your cancer risk using one of several models. If the risk is high enough, it may justify the surgery. Read more...