Where can women with breast cancer find support?

Internet or Office. There are many places to seek! several internet support groups are out there. You should also check with your oncologist, surgeon or radiation oncologists. Several doctor's office offer support groups for their patients.
1-800-4-CANCER. I suggest you start by calling the above number, which is sponsored by the national cancer institute; they should be able to give you a list of local support groups. In addition, i recommend that you call your local hospital, as most have support groups that regularly meet at the hospital. Good luck!

Related Questions

I've read about women with breast cancer in one breast choosing to have both removed.  why would you do that?

Multiple reasons. For many it is a personal decision, they may feel there body failed them and they don't "need them anymore". For those with a gene mutation that puts them at high risk of getting another breast cancer it can substantially reduce their risk. If someone needs a mastectomy on one side they may opt to have both removed for symmetry. Read more...
Several reasons. 1. To avoid getting a second cancer in the healthy breast down the road 2. Because she has a brca1/2 mutation which puts her at higher risk for a second breast cancer 3. To have breast reconstruction done on both breasts at the same time 4. To avoid the anxiety and nuisance of mammograms and biopsies in the future. Read more...
Risk. This is a decision based on risk. If after counseling, the risk of a future breast cancer is increased due to family history, personal history, or genetic testing, sometimes a prophylactic mastectomy is recommended. Currently it is felt that this is an all too common practice amongst average risk patients. Read more...

Do most women with breast cancer experience another breakout?

Hopefully not. It is entirely dependent on the stage & type of breast cancer & completing the full recommended treatments. Needs close observation after treatments. Small early breast cancers have a 98% chance of never having recurrent cancer, but larger or more advanced stages do have a higher recurrence risk. Read more...
No. The reality is that well more than half of all women diagnosed with breast cancer will not die from breast cancer. While it is impossible to predict the time of cancer recurrence, the stage of the cancer can help guide treatment recommendations and predict the probability of cancer recurrence. However, even if cancer recurs, it may be sensitive to medication that can prolong survival for years. Read more...

Why do we give anti-estrogen drugs to post-menopausal women with breast cancer?

Anti-estrogen drugs. Anti-estrogen drugs are given to both premenopausal and postmenopausal women whose cancer is estrogen receptor-positive or progesterone receptor-positive. These cancer may grow when exposed to estrogen. Anti-estrogen medications block or reduce estrogen that is normally produced by the ovaries in premenopausal women or by fat cells, liver, adrenal glands or other organs in postmenopausal women. Read more...

Women that don't have children have a relative risk of 1.6 - 1.9 of getting breast cancer. What does this actually mean though?

Breast feeding. seems to reduce your risk. If the average risk is 1, those who never had children or breast fed are 1.6-1.9 times more likely to get breast cancer. Another way to look at this is to call breast feeding a treatment. Those who "receive" it (i.e breast feed) are 1/1.9 or 50 percent less likely to get breast cancer. Read more...

Should a woman who has two relatives in the same family with breast cancer history be concerned? Even if the relatives aren't of the same generation?

Maybe. Breast cancer is a common cancer, so it is not uncommon for relatives of a family to have multiple breast cancers. Cause for concern would be breast cancer at a young age (below early 40s) in multiple blood relatives, and also the presence of ovarian cancer. Genetic counselors are trained to review family histories and genetic testing based on those histories. Read more...