5 doctors weighed in:

5y son had a moving tooth for a while.Now fell but new one seems to go in wrong direction, probably because resistance of 1st one?.Will it change now?

5 doctors weighed in
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Hard to say...

It is very possible that the primary tooth prevented the adult tooth from erupting correctly, or it just may be genetics.
Either way, by now, at 5 yrs old, your son should have a good relationship with a local dentist. If he doesn't now is the time to start. Make the call for an appointment and have him evaluated.

In brief: Hard to say...

It is very possible that the primary tooth prevented the adult tooth from erupting correctly, or it just may be genetics.
Either way, by now, at 5 yrs old, your son should have a good relationship with a local dentist. If he doesn't now is the time to start. Make the call for an appointment and have him evaluated.
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
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Dr. Jeffrey Goldstein
Dentistry - Cosmetic
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Possibly.

When a tooth come in out of position, sometimes the pressure of the lip and tongue can straighten it.
I don't know which tooth you are concerned about. I would recommend a consultation with an orthodontist. Many of them will not even charge for a consultation, and you'll get the best advice possible!

In brief: Possibly.

When a tooth come in out of position, sometimes the pressure of the lip and tongue can straighten it.
I don't know which tooth you are concerned about. I would recommend a consultation with an orthodontist. Many of them will not even charge for a consultation, and you'll get the best advice possible!
Dr. Jeffrey Goldstein
Dr. Jeffrey Goldstein
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Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dentistry - Orthodontics

In brief: Needs exam

5 is a little young for lower incisors to exchange.
For boys we usually see this at about age 7. Please ask your child's Dentist to take a look. If there are any questions, see a dento-facial growth and development specialist. It's never too early for an expert opinion.

In brief: Needs exam

5 is a little young for lower incisors to exchange.
For boys we usually see this at about age 7. Please ask your child's Dentist to take a look. If there are any questions, see a dento-facial growth and development specialist. It's never too early for an expert opinion.
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dr. Arnold Malerman
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Dr. Gary Lederman
Dentistry

In brief: Maybe

Hard to know what will happen.
Must be evaluated by a dentist if our really want a valuable opinion.

In brief: Maybe

Hard to know what will happen.
Must be evaluated by a dentist if our really want a valuable opinion.
Dr. Gary Lederman
Dr. Gary Lederman
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Dr. Kevin Olson
Family Medicine

In brief: Yes

Itshould straighten on its own within genetic limits.

In brief: Yes

Itshould straighten on its own within genetic limits.
Dr. Kevin Olson
Dr. Kevin Olson
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1 comment
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Permanent lower incisors are about 20% larger than the baby teeth. Tooth size is only one of the many determinants as to alignment success. An Orthodontic Consultation (often free or modest cost) would be advisable.
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Dr. Jonathan Jassey
Board Certified, Pediatrics
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