What is opsoclonus/myoclonus?

Rare. Opsoclonus myoclonus is a rare neurological disorder characterized by unsteady gait, intention tremor myoclonus (brief, shock-like muscle spasms), and opsoclonus (irregular, rapid, horizontal and vertical eye movements). Other symptoms may include dysphasia (difficulty speaking), dysarthria (poorly articulated speech), lethargy, irritability, malaise. It occurs in viral illnesses and tumors.
Random eye movements. The patient experiences constant irregular rapid eye motions in random directions, often in a sudden jerking fashion (myoclonus). This was first described in children with neuroblastomas, but has been rarely associated with problems affecting cerebellar-brainstem connections in other diseases, such as even in multiple sclerosis.

Related Questions

Does any doctor on here have any experience with Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome???

Opsoclonus myoclonus. This is a syndrome with very abnormal eye movements and unsteadiness/impaired balance. The causes are differnt depending on the age. It often indicated a tumor called neurobalstoma in children. It may indicate another kind of cancer in adults such as lung cancer. It is an immune mediated neurological condition. Treatment will be treatment of thee unbderlying condition or tumor. Read more...

Is opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia a genetic problem, if coming from breast cancer. My gran got it after breast cancer. I have autoimmune problems and was wondering, if it is a one off thing or genetic.

Not familial. I'm sorry about your grandmother and I am glad you are taking a proactive approach to your health. The syndrome you describe is usually due to anti-ri antibodies that attack a breast cancer and cross-react with some of the cells in the nervous system. If you do not have breast cancer, this is not a risk, and i've seen nothing to make me think that having other autoimmune disease puts you at risk. Read more...
Clarification. Most often associated with childhood hemangioblastoma, but can be seen with other conditions on a far less frequent basis. Likely not a clearcut autoimmune condition but more likely secondary to a paraneoplastic effect of a tumor, essentially a toxic response at a distance. Hard to say if truly genetic susceptibility and unlikely that you might be at risk. Read more...