5 doctors weighed in:

What are monoclonal antibodies?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Timothy Ashley
Internal Medicine & Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: All the same

Antibodies are complex protein molecules made by the immune system. The have a variable portion that can be made specific to a target.
"monoclonal" refers to antibodies whose variable regions are all the same. When directed at specific biological targets, e.g. Inflammatory mediators, they can be used as drugs ("biologics") to modify diseases.

In brief: All the same

Antibodies are complex protein molecules made by the immune system. The have a variable portion that can be made specific to a target.
"monoclonal" refers to antibodies whose variable regions are all the same. When directed at specific biological targets, e.g. Inflammatory mediators, they can be used as drugs ("biologics") to modify diseases.
Dr. Timothy Ashley
Dr. Timothy Ashley
Thank
Dr. Thomas Klein
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology

In brief: Specific antibodies

Monoclonal antibodies are monospecific antibodies that are the same because they are made by identical immune cells that are all clones of a unique parent cell, in contrast to polyclonal antibodies which are made from several different immune cells.
Monoclonal antibodies have monovalent affinity, in that they bind to the same epitope.

In brief: Specific antibodies

Monoclonal antibodies are monospecific antibodies that are the same because they are made by identical immune cells that are all clones of a unique parent cell, in contrast to polyclonal antibodies which are made from several different immune cells.
Monoclonal antibodies have monovalent affinity, in that they bind to the same epitope.
Dr. Thomas Klein
Dr. Thomas Klein
Thank
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