My friend has recently had breast reconstruction surgery after breast cancer and she was wondering if it is possible to still breast feed?

Depends. If she and a mastectomy, most (97%) of her breast tissue was removed and she won't be able to breastfeed on that side, even if she had reconstruction. Breast reconstruction uses an implant or the patient's own tissue (flap) to replace the tissue removed by mastectomy. However, the reconstructed breast cannot produce milk. If she kept her other breast, she will be able to breastfeed on that side.
Depends on variables. The original surgery or the reconstruction may or may not have interfered with the internal structures needed to make or transfer milk from the glands forward to the nipple, If so, breast feeding would not be possible. If they did not, it might be.The surgeons involved might be able to answer the question with more reliability.

Related Questions

Breast reconstruction after breast cancer. Why can't I find a doctor to take my medicade? I am trying to have breast reconstruction surgery after breast cancer.

Sorry . Sorry about your issue here. I am not familiar with your medicaid policy. I do accept medicare here in california. It is ironic, though, that the government frequently speaks of medicare cutbacks. However, doctors often make very little profit or even lose money while treating medicare patients. People frequently view doctors as eternally wealthy. However, with the cost of malpractice insurance, office rent, and staffing, the cost to run a practice is high. And one can only continue to practice for so long when making little or no profit. Unfortunately, there is more and more business administration in medicine than there ever has been. Though we don't like to view health care as a business, it certainly plays a role. Keep looking. You will find help. It may just take time and effort. Good luck! Read more...
Breast . Breast reconstruction is federally mandated as a medical necessity and therefore covered by insurance, no matter what coverage you have incluidnh medicaid. The problem is that not all doctors accept medicaid. You will need to call around to local plastic surgeons to find one that will be willing to take care of you. You can check with your primary physician for a recommendation but ulimately it will be up to the individual surgeon. Read more...
Difficult problems. This is a difficult problem as more and more hospitals are turning away medicaid patients as the cost to treat them is much more than the reimbursement by medicaid. Saying that- keep searching. Our cancer center in orlando does accept medicaid. Call 321-841-7090 to find out more. Read more...
Breast cancer. I am very sorry to hear this. Each state is different. Please search locally for resources for breast cancer survivors. There may be funds or other resources available though a nonprofit or other organization that can help you. Read more...
Sad commentary. -Medicaid rations care; doctors under compensated; patients struggle. Health reforms aren't national, vary state by state. Ethically should be same everywhere. Read more...

Is breast cancer harder to detect after breast reconstruction surgery?

Usually not. Breast reconstruction involves expanders/implants beneath the chest muscles, allowing the tissues just under the skin surface (where the breast used to be) to be easily examined, but tissue reconstruction (tram, diep, or latissimus flaps) bring new non-breast tissues into the former breast region, and require careful examination or scans to detect recurrence. Good follow-up is part of cancer care. Read more...
Rarely yes.... It is a rare but possible problem particularly with implant reconstruction types. Read more...
Not usually. Most recurrences occur close to the skin so are usually palpable (fairly easy to feel) regardless of whether the patient had reconstruction, or the type of reconstruction used. With implant reconstruction, the implants are placed under the chest muscle which pushes deep tissues closer to the skin and allows for easier exam. Reconstruction has no impact on breast cancer follow-up imaging studies. Read more...

How safe is the alloderm procedure? I was advised by a doctor to have alloderm when I consulted him for a breast reconstruction surgery following breast cancer. What are the possible side effects of the procedure?

Alloderm . Alloderm is a good tool during breast reconstruction. It is used to reduce risks such a capsular contracture and to better emvelope the implant. Please consult a board certified plastic surgeon. Read more...
Alloderm . Acellular cadaveric dermal matrices (adms) like alloderm have been increasingly popular with breast reconstruction. Advantages: 1) ability to salvage, in event of mastectomy flap necrosis; 2) lesser extent of capsular contracture if post=op radiation therapy is recommended; 3) improved positioning of the eventual reconstruction. Disadvantages: 1) seroma; 2) infection. Read more...
Fairly Safe. Alloderm is often used to add additional support to the inferior portion of the implant. Think of it like a hammock to hold the implant. The side effects are similar to other implant based reconstructions. Bleeding, infection, fluid collections are the most common side effects. Read more...
Alloderm. Alloderm is commonly used in breast reconstruction with tissue expanders and permanent implant. It is composed of human cadaver skin that has been treated to remove the cells that would lead your body to reject it. Overall the product has been used in thousands of patients and has been discussed widely in surgical literature. Read more...
Very few. It is a very safe procedure, it's the standard of care for breast reconstruction. There are not many side effects. Read more...
Alloderm for Breast. I have been using alloderm since the early 2000 in breast reconstruction and it has added another dimension in our ability to perform primary reconstruction or perform redo's, that wasn't available to us in the past. The side effects are limited to slightly increased chances of seroma formation and infection rarely. Read more...

Can I still breast feed if I had breast cancer?

Yes. Yes you can. Just be aware that you may or may not experience decreased milk production on the breast that underwent surgery and/or radiation treatment. Read more...

I was pillow fighitng with my friend and his knee accidently hit my breast, I am worry because I am breastfeeding, can hit cause me a breast cancer?

No. There have been some studies that propsed that trauma and the chronic inflamatory state that can follow from blood in the tissues, etc. May lead to carcinogenesis (new cancer growth) but at this point i think it is far from proven. There is excellent info on risk factors at http://www.Cancer.Org/cancer/breastcancer/index i would say it is very unlikely a knee to the breast would cause cancer. Read more...

Breast cancer and I am planning on breastfeeding could I still get a mammogram if my breast are full of milk?

No. Not a good time to do mammogram while breast feeding. First the breast is engorged and full of cysts. Second the radiation will be passed into the baby. Read more...
The lactational. changes in the breasts make them more dense, and therefore limit the value of mammography. For screening purposes, waiting 4-6 months after stopping breastfeeding will allow the breasts to return to their baseline state. If you have a lump, see your doctor. If you end up needing a mammo for diagnostic purposes, you can pump the breasts beforehand. Read more...

Can a woman with breast cancer breast feed?

Yes. Prior breast cancer does not Prohibit a woman from breastfeeding, however, the affected breast may not prodice much milk if treated by radiation therapy. Furthermore, any medication that you are taking, including chemotherapy, may be transmitted in the breast milk and should be avoided. Read more...
Possible. It is possible, but this is best discussed with your oncologists who can discuss further based on your individual treatment plan. Read more...

Will my chances of getting breast cancer increase if I don't breast feed?

Not inthe big scheme. Breast feeding per se lowers your risk but pales in comparison to carrying to term a pregnancy before your are 23 yo. - that has more benefit - but hold the horses- i got three daughters myself and would not use that as an excuse for an early pregnancy. We are working at fox chase on chromosomal changes that occur with pregnancy to see if we can elucidate those changes that give that benefit. Read more...
Not really. The evidence linking breastfeeding and risk of breast cancer is weak at best. Prolonged breast feeding may reduce risk but is likely due to fewer menstrual cycles over the lifetime not due to breastfeeding. Read more...
Varies. Your risk depends on many factors. You should discuss your concerns with your friendly primary care physician. Read more...