Can you get postpartum depression as far out as 24 months after having your baby?

Depression. You can get depression at any point, but probably not labelled postpartum after 2 yrs.
Occurs earlier. Most often PPD present in the first 3-4 months, but can occur anytime in the first postpartum year. Likely at 24 months, it would be diagnosed as a depression but not postpartum. However, with that said, there are exceptions.. Such as a case in which if you have been breastfeeding and then suddenly wean at 24 months and symptoms of PPD present. In that case, i would probably call it ppd.
Possibly. It's possible to get depression 24 months after having a baby but most people wouldn't call it postpartum depression and would just label it as depression. I would recommend talking to your doctor about this.
Maybe. Most importantly, if you are having symptoms of depression, you must be seen and properly evaluated. Please do not take chances. Good luck.

Related Questions

I have heard that if I have another child I will get postpartum depression again, but worse. Is this true? I did not get it with my first child.

Post partum . If you have not had depression before (at any time in your life) your risk does not increase with a second, third or later child. If you have had it before, then your risk is higher, but you can take steps to avoid it or to be treated very early. Read more...
No that is not true. If you did not get it with your first child, your risk should be no greater than the general population of childbearing women, which is between 10-20%. The risk would only increase beyond that if you experienced PPD before. Then, the risk for a subsequent pregnancy would increase up to 50%. However there are ways to lower that seem to lower that risk factor.. Preventative measures. Read more...

How long after delivering a baby are you able to get postpartum depression?

POSTPARTUM DEPRESSIO. It depends on the patient. Sometimes it takes months before symptoms appear, occasionally at once after delivery due to stress of having a baby. Read more...

What can I do to get over postpartum depression?

Getting over. Postpartum depression can have devastating consequences for both the mother and the newborn child. Make an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible. Read more...
Call your physician. Contact a mental health professional with specialization/expertise in assessment and treatment of postpartum depression. You can contact postpartum support, international at www.Postpartum.Net. Read more...

Is it possible to have postpartum depression even when your child is over a year old?

Maybe. One can develop depression any time. If you were not depressed during the first few months after your baby is born, we wouldn't call it postpartum depression. If you were depressed during the postpartum period and it wasn't treated, you may still be depressed when the baby is a year old. Untreated postpartum depression often lasts over a year. Talk to your doctor! Read more...

If I am still not over the baby blues after two months, does that mean I have postpartum depression?

No. Not neccesarily, but not something you should ignore either. Post-partum depression does take into account how long symptoms are present, but also how severe and life-altering these symptoms are. There are lots of screening tests you can use online, and if these are positive, you need to talk to your own doctor or pediatrician for futher evaluation and help. This is very treatable - ask for help! Read more...
No. Baby blues can simply be adjustment to a whole new way of life and/or prolonged hormonal imbalance. First contact your ob/gyn. If you are interested in integrative therapies, craniosacral therapy and acupuncture/traditional chinese medicine have a lot to offer that bring you relief. Check your area for practitioners. Read more...
Likely. Baby blues only lasts from a few days to three weeks. Beyond three weeks it is likely either an adjustment disorder or postpartum depression. You should seek an evaluation from a mental health professional who has expertise in diagnosing postpartum disorders. Read more...
YES. The baby blues only last the first 2 weeks after birth. If you continue to have or have developed significant changes in your mood, energy, sleep, enjoyment, fluctuations in these or anxiety or feeling not like yourself, you likely have "ppd". Seek an expert through www.Postpartum.Net, or you may write me through healthtap to answer ?'s, find you a specialist near you. Read more...
Maybe. You may very well have a clinical depression, or you may be fatigued, or have some other condition. Get checked by your gynecologist, and perhaps your family physician for depression, thyroid, diabetes, and other common ailments. They may not be certain, but you don't want to be unnecessarily ill when you have a newborn. Read more...
Get checked. If you think you could be having post-partum depression then you should get checked. It is even more important to get checked immediately if you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or others, especially your baby. Read more...

Postpartum depression and the baby blues. Is all this sadness?

No. The hallmark of depression is a diminished ability to enjoy things that should be enjoyable. If that occurs, the individual needs to see their physician. The blues are typically not associated with this symptom. However, "blues" that persist for more than 2 weeks should be evaluated by your doctor. Read more...

How to get over postpartum depression?

Get Help. Postpartum depression is usually as the result of chemical changes that can occur in a woman's body after delivery. Psychotropic medications are often necessary -so it is best to seek professional help. Read more...
Call your physician. Contact a mental health professional with specialization/expertise in assessment and treatment of postpartum depression. You can also pick up a copy of my book, happy endings, new beginnings: navigating postpartum disorders at your local barnes & noble or online at amazon.Com. You can contact postpartum support, international at www.Postpartum.Net. Read more...