Information on surgical oncology and cancer research?

NIH or ACS website. The nih/nci website can give you a lot of information of surgical oncology, clinical trials available for certain cancers. The american cancer society website has information on all types of cancers including the surgical and nonsurgical treatments available.
Surgery for cancer . What exactly your question is? What specific information do you want to know? Surgical oncology deals with surgical treatment of cancer and there is a lot of research going on at many university to find out what surgical treatment is most effective for what type of cancer.

Related Questions

Information on surgical oncology and cancer doctors?

Surgical oncology. You can find out information about surgical oncologists at this website:www.Surgonc.Org. This site will even help you find a cancer surgeon near you. Read more...
Cancer ctr websites. Depending on where you live, there are invariably cancer centers. The websites of most centers will review the level of accreditation of the center and the profile of the phyisicians and surgeons who practice there. Read more...

If I had colon cancer do I need to find center in surgical oncology?

If it is resectable. If there is no evidence that cancer has spread somewhere- & if it is resectable- you will need to see a colorectal surgeon. If cancer has spread to distant organ- in almost all cases-you will probably not need to see a surgeon - unless- if metastatic disease is very limited and surgery can be done to remove the lesion- after chemo or if there is evidence of obstruction- you need to see a surgeon. Read more...
?center. If one has resectable (i.e. Found at a decent stage) colon cancer, one does not necessarily need to go to a "center for surgical oncology" (ex: md anderson, dana farber) for surgery. Surgery or resection of the cancer can be done by a general surgeon in your area. Read more...
Cancer center. Find a comprehensive cancer center with full range of doctors, nurses, and other services. These usually offer widest range of treatments. Read more...
If its localized. For colon cancer that has not spread to another organ on ct you will need a surgeon, yes! Read more...
Most colorectal. Surgery can be done by a general surgeon. However, particularly if there is a "low lying" rectal lesion, you may want a surgeon with vast experience in "low anterior resections. Many general hospitals have these surgeons on staff; unfortunately not all "cancer centers" do, even the bona fide nci designanted ones. Read more...
Surgical rx for crc. Many general surgeons can more than adequately excise colon cancer. However there is medical literature suggesting better outcomes when surgery is performed by a fellowship trained colorectal surgeon. Read more...
No. You just need to find a surgeon who has experience with colon cancer surgery. Ask them how many they have done and ask around. Just because a surgeon is at a university, it does not mean they are the best. But get a second opinion. No reason not to. Hope this helps. Read more...

Medical and surgical oncology: Can 2 pathologists look at the same suspect cell under glass and 1 decide it is cancer and the other not cancer?

Pathologists vary. Yes, two individuals can examine the same cells and come to different conclusions. In this case I'd suggest getting a 3rd person to look at the material. The 3rd pathologist could act as a tie breaker. I would suggest sending it to a large medical institution such as a medical school. Read more...

Surgical oncology: Whipple may be the only cure for pancreatic cancer? But, it is a huge operation with many months of recovery? Go through it?

Some do. Some don't. If the outlook is not good, the PATIENT must decide whether to live a better, shorter life, or try for a longer life through more pain and suffering. Life on Earth is always short, regardless of whether a person lives 3 days, 3000 days, or 30,000 days. It is not length of one's life that matters, but the quality of the life lived. The goal may be not to live a long life, but to live a good life. Read more...
Depends. You are right, a Whipple is a big operation. Fortunately, many patients have a great outcome and the recovery is generally about 8 weeks, not always "many months". True, if you have a complication, it can take this long. It really depends how strong you are going into the operation, the anatomy of your cancer, and your cancer stage. Talk with your surgeon. Read more...