Related Questions

Concerning those who had prk laser eye surgery, how would you describe the "blurry" vision, what to do?

PRK. Prk is a type of corneal laser surface treatment that doesn't require a flap to be created, as in lasik. But it takes longer to recover from, and typically 1-3 months for your vision to stabilize. Talk to your surgeon. It is also important to treat dry eyes, and although the surgey may have reduced your prescription greatly, there still may be a little left that some glasses would improve. Read more...

I have RA, on plaquenil for 2 years, I asked the dr if I could do laser eye surgery he suggested PRK After stoping plaqenil for a while. Wht do u think?

PRK? not sure, is that an eye surgery technique?
Hydroxychloroquin reacts to light making laser eye surgery more risky. I don't know what to tell you. He is saying the usual plan, but the drug makes long term deposits so I don't know how long you SHOULD wait. Read more...

Which laser eye surgery correct both my nearsightedness and astigmatism? Do either of the popular types of laser eye surgery, lasik or prk, fix these issues so that i'll have 20/20 vision or close to it? I can't wear contacts; I've worn glasses since I wa

Laser eye surgery. Laser eye surgery can correct most amounts of myopia and astigmatism as long as you are otherwise a good laser candidate. Both lasik and prk can treat these refractive errors and are equally effective long term. Read more...
LASIK or PRK. In general, results for nearsightedness and regular astigmatism are very good with either treatment. Many people achieve excellent vision after these treatments. It would be important to know why someone could not wear contacts - as in cases of irregular astigmatism where laser correction would not be an option. Read more...

Lasik or lasek or prk I am a good candidate for laser eye surgery, but I have been getting different answers regarding which surgery is best and safest. I hear many rumors, but where are the statistics?

Safety . Safety is good for all, but if your eyes are good candidates for lasik--that will give you the quickest vision recovery. Read more...
Both . Both surgeries are extremely effective, lasik has a slightly longer track record. You need a consult with a surgeon who performs both surgeries. Lasik has a faster recovery, and as long as you don't have thin corneas or dry eyes, will work well for you. Statistically speaking, outcomes are almost identical. Balance the risks and benefits, avoid the hype, and you will find the right procedure for you. Don't let any surgeon tell you that there is only one procedure out there that is 'the' answer for all patients. You have to avoid advice that is biased or one-sided to decide what works best, make a decision based on logic and statistics. In other words, don't listen to rumors, seek facts! good luck in your search. Read more...
IntraLase . Intralase is safer than lasik because it's safer to cut your eye with a laser than a metal blade lasek is safer than intralase as there is no cutting at all the only downside is the healing takes a few days longer i gave a talk at harvard w 100 eye surgeons in the audience last year made them vote on which procedure they would have themselves if forced to get one 95 chose lasek/epilasek and only 5 chose lasik/intralase that should tell you something hope this helps! Read more...
I . I should have answered this question more clearly, so this is an addendum to my first reply statistically, approximately 90% of all lasik complications involve the flap in some way. Either cutting the flap, or afterwards having some type of problem related to the flap. All you have to do is a google search of images, and type in "lasik complications" and you will see that the vast majority of complications involve the flap in some way (eg, flap wrinkles, incomplete flap, dlk or inflammation under the flap, epithelial ingrowth under the flap, etc) therefore, by not cutting a lasik or intralase flap to begin with, you are eliminating 90% of all possible complications--meaning that, statistically, a no-flap procedure (such as lasek or prk) must be 10x safer than an incisional one the only downside to advanced surface ablations is that it takes a couple of more days to heal, and there is some very minor discomfort during those days. I had lasik myself (i was the 1st lasik surgeon in nyc to have lasik himself, way back in 1999 when there were no good alternative procedures), and can tell you that there is no pain at all, and you recover in 1-2 days. With asas, there is some minor discomfort and your surface heals, and it takes 3-4 days, which is double the time i should have also been more precise in my survey of 100 eye surgeons across the country who drove and flew in for the "updates in ophthalmology" course given at cape cod, organized by a harvard and tufts-affiliated surgeon of the 100 eye surgeons in the audience, i made them vote on which type of procedure they were now primarily performing. 90% said that they were primarily performing incisional procedures, ie lasiks and intralase, which was the expected answer i then asked the following question: "if you were forced to yourself undergo a refractive procedure now, either to get rid of your glasses or contacts for distance or reading (many of them were in their 50s so in reading glasses), knowing what you do about possible complications, even if rare, which type of procedure would you have yourself?" the answer to this question was both surprising and stunning, and even a bit disconcerting 90% of them voted the opposite direction--ie, they said if it were their own eyes, they would have a nonincisional procedure (lasek or epilasek, or if non-advanced, a prk) when i asked them to explain this contradiction, they said things like; "we know it's marginally safer to have a non-incisional surgery, but cannot convince the patients that a recovery that is twice as long (4 vs 2 days) is worth saving this low risk" so it is true that the vast majority of eye surgeons in the us today are still doing incisional procedures, and it is also true that they will have excellent results without a major flap complication over 99% of the time, however, to get that success rate as close as possible to 100%, you really have to get a non-incisional procedure thanks and hope this helps. Read more...
LASEK . Lasek and prk are both forms of surface ablation. Numerous studies have shown that standard prk with removal of the epithelium is less painful and heals more quickly than lasek where the epithelium is placed back on. Lasik involves making a flap and its advantage is much faster healing. Unless not a good candidate for lasik, it would be strange to want a procedure that is more painful and takes much longer to heal. If prk surface ablation is your only choice for a variety of reasons, it works well and gives the same vision as lasik over the long run. Read more...
I . I agree with dr. Goldstein. They are not the same. In lasik, a thin flap is made on your cornea either with a high speed blade or with a laser. Then the flap is lifted to expose the cornea that will be reshaped with a laser. In lasek (also called epi-lasik), the epithelium (skin of the cornea) is temporarily removed to expose the cornea for laser. They both have positive and negative aspects. The main difference is the pain you will feel after the surgery when the anesthesia wears off. There is minimum pain with lasik, patients often describe it as a scratch sensation for three hours. With lasek, there is lot more pain. I had lasek and it was painful for almost a week. The reason i had lasek was the issue with flaps. Creating the flap will cause your cornea to be significantly thinner. If your cornea is too thin, it can lead to other more serious problems. Also understand that reshaping of your cornea actually remove more corneal tissue. Higher the prescription, more corneal will be removed. For this reason, some patients do not qualify for lasik but can be a candidate for lasek. All patients will develop dry eyes after surgery with either lasik or lasek! this is because the nerves to the cornea that control your blinking is either cut and burned (lasik) or burned (lasek). So patients will blink at a lower rate leading to dry eyes. For this reason, they must all use plenty of artificial tears after the surgery until the nerves grow back in three to six months. Read more...
Laser eye surgery. If you are good candidate for all three types of laser eye surgery, each option is equally safe for vision correction. Each procedure has its own specific risks but all three are incredibly safe in appropriate candidates. Read more...
LASIK LASEK PRK femt. Prk is preferred for thin corneas and dry eyes. As a surgeon, i know that most reported surgical complications from laser vision correction are flap related / dry eye. I tell patients that prk is more painful with slower recovery, but my preference -no flap / less dry eye. The final visual results are equal. In the end the informed patient makes the decision. Over 40 > risk epi defect w lasik. Read more...

What is the laser eye surgery recovery process like?

What procedure? There are many eye laser procedures, all with different recovery times. Lasik is probably the fastest recovery, with most physical and visual symptoms resolved within days up to a week (dry eye symptoms can persist). Prk takes at least a week to heal. Retinal laser and glaucoma laser procedures usually feel normal physically in less than a day, but the desired effects can take weeks to months. Read more...
Generally smooth. I am guessing that you are talking about lasik refractive surgery to correct vision. Recovery is usually rapid, with little discomfort and rapid restoration of vision. You will need drops for prevention of infection, to promote healing and lubricate the eye. Mostly this is not a problem. Read more...

Can you tell me how has laser eye surgery changed in the past 15 years?

Ophthalmic Lasers. Lasers have been used for 1.Glaucoma treatment : NdYAG. Argon. Krypton. Dye lasers, SLT and now the new ECP Endoscopic CycloPhotocoagulation (ECP) 2. CATARACTS : Femtosecond laser by Optimedica is still experimental. 3. Corneal Refractive Laser surgery with a femtosecond laser works with extremely short infrared laser pulses. One pulse is 1 femtosecond or 0.000000000000001 second to create . Read more...

How often can you need a touch up or enhancement after laser eye surgery?

As needed. Most people don't end up needing any significant enhancements but the answer to your question is as much as needed. Hopefully that's never, but for those who do, usually once is all it takes. Read more...
Depends on your eyes. The corrective effects of laser vision correction are usually permanent. Occasionally, there can be a small healing response or rarely a thinning of the cornea that causes its shape to change and the prescription to shift. As well, as one approaches the 50s and beyond, changes in the natural lens of the eye cause prescription changes despite how effective lasik was. Read more...