What to expect for epidural or general anesthesia?

Please clarify. These are too broad of topics to be answered in 400 characters. Can you narrow your focus or rephrase your question? .
For GA. you will be asleep and with epidural might be able to move your feet slightly and feel light touch but not pain.

Related Questions

Epidural block is regional, local or, general anesthesia?

Regional. General anesthesia requires uncosciousness, usually along with airway protection (endotracheal tube or similar). Regional anesthesia includes application of local anesthetic in various locations, usually in the spine (spinal or epidural) or on a nerve plexus (to numb an arm or a leg). Local anesthesia is injection of local directly un the tissue that hurts or is about to hurt from surgery. Read more...
Regional. An epidural block refers to either anesthesia or analgesia. The later is used for pain control for labo, after surgery , renal stones or other pain conditions. The former is used for surgery itself. The difference is the strength of the local anesthetic used for the block. The stronger the dose the more numb you become. Read more...
Regional. It my combined with general anesthesia, used for post op pain, or include local injections for longer lasting analgesia. Read more...
Regional. This is a regional anesthetic technique that uses local anesthesia injected around the spinal cord. Read more...

Supposing I'm allergic to general anesthesia, am I also allergic to an epidural?

Not really. Allergic to general anesthesia such as having malignant hyperthermia does not mean that you are also allergic to the local anesthetics used in the epidural. Read more...
Anyone can have GA. You may have had a reaction to one of the many medications that can be used as part of general anesthesia. But we can tailor general anesthesia for anyone safely by choosing different medications. Anyone can have ga. Your previous reaction (what was it?) doesn't mean that you can't have an epidural. Consult a physician anesthesiologist for more info. Read more...

What happens if im allergic to general anesthesia am I also allergic to an epidural?

Not necessary. General anesthesia is the administration of general anesthetic agents that make a person unconscious. It’s achieved with certain medicines that put you into a deep sleep. Just for your information, variety of the different drugs combination is available and the procedure relatively safe. An epidural is an anesthetic (lidocaine) delivered through a small tube into an epidural space. Read more...
Bring your . Records to your surgery. A good anesthesiologist will be able to develop an anesthetic plan that doesn't trigger an allergic reaction. Read more...
Probably not . General anesthesia is not just one thing. It is a pharmaceutical plan of many drugs. It would be helpful to know which one you are allergic to and that one can be avoided. You are certainly not allergic to ALL of them. Epidural are a way to administer a local anesthetic over time. If you are not allergic to any local anesthetics, you can have an epidural. . Read more...
Unlikely. General anesthetic agents have been used in billions of patients without a problem. I suspect your issues were with the operator giving you an overdose of something. The problem is not the drugs, but the operator. Similarly, with the epidural, which, in the right hands, has also been used in billions of patients without a problem. I very much doubt you're "allergic" to either form. Read more...
Unlikely. In general anesthesia, allergy to the muscle relaxant appears to be the most common problem. Allergy to local anesthetic is possible but only very few well-documented cases have been published. Since the anesthetic used in Epidural is not usually the ones employed in general anesthesia, it is highly unlikely that you would have problem with the epidural. Read more...

What happens if I'm allergic to general anesthesia am I also allergic to an epidural?

No. No one is allergic to all medications used in general anesthesia. Have a consultation with a physician anesthesiologist who can help you find out which medications are a problem for you and which ones aren't. The local anesthetics (numbing medications) used in epidurals should not be any problem for you. It's important to sort this out in case you ever need emergency surgery. Read more...
Impossible. There is no such thing as an allergy to general anesthesia. General anesthesia is a mix of many different medications, if you are allergic to one of them we either exclude it or replace it with a different medication. And almost no one is allergic to an epidural, again we can change the medications that go into it. Read more...

Is general anesthesia for c-section more dangerous than just as epidural?

Relatively, yes. Once a patient is put to sleep with general anesthesia, the OB surgeon has a finite(short) period of time to remove the baby prior to it being affected by the anesthesia drugs and being delivered in a flaccid state. Epidural anesthesia is "safer" as the patient is awake even though this modality carries some risks as well. Read more...

If general anesthesia isn't possible for toenail removal, what about an epidural?

Questionable. An epidural may provide some pain relief from the procedure but it would not be a first choice. In this case the risks of an epidural would likely outweigh the benefits. A digital block, ankle block, or more proximal nerve block would work better and be more appropriate. Read more...
Not really. There are much simpler options such as using injections of 'numbing' medication around the nerve, sedation, or even a spinal. For this minor procedure, an epidural can be used however it may be riskier than other options. Read more...

Please write strongest pain medication, complete drug plan for post C-section pain. I chose C-section with general anesthesia. I don't want spinal or epidural?

A choice. Depending on your hospital policies and procedures, you could have a spinal or an epidural. Those are preferrable to general anesthesia which can get to the baby in just a few minutes and increase the risk to the baby of respiratory distrress. An advantage to the epidural is that it can be left in place for 24 hours after surgery, allowing you significant pain relief in the first post op day. Read more...
Analgesia. It would not be practical to provide you with rx plan for postop analgaesia without knowing your medical history. You have tied your anesthesiologist's hands by declining spinal/epidural. Both techniques can have opiate adjuvants which diminishes motor blockade whilst maintains sensory blockade. Elective general anesthesia for delivery is dangerous and as an anesthesiologist i wouldn't do that. Read more...
See below. Pain tolerance varies between patients. Some patients in the post-operative period only need motrin, while some need narcotics. General anesthesia for the procedure is not the preferred choice as it increases the risk of death for the mother. Talk to your anesthesiologist before the procedure. Read more...
Get the epidural. Epidural will manage pain better than narcotics. Narcotic can also be injected directly into spinal cord with pain benefits and less side effects. General is dangerous in pregnancy. The airway is very edematous and can be difficult to intubate. I would suggest epidural. Read more...

Help, I can't stand the pain of shots in my toes. If general anesthesia isn't possible for toenail removal, what about an epidural?

Yes. An epidural or spinal can be used but both are overkill for a toe nail removal. The procedure takes only minutes and either the epidural or spinal will last a min of 1 hour. If this is being done in a hospital the anesthesiologist can give a small dose of propafol let you dose off for a minute as the doctor injects the toes. That's how I used to do it. Read more...
If your aversion. Is hat bad you can have IV sedation. Once sedated, the foot doctor could give local anesthesia as you would be out if it and the procedure could be done. Read more...