How much does orthognathic surgery (jaw alignment surgery) hurt?

Orthognathic Surgery. With any type of surgery, there is bound to be some associated discomfort. Usually, a good postoperative pain regimen can alleviate most of that pain. Oddly enough, the chief complaint after orthognathic surgery is seldom pain. Hope this helps.
Surprisingly little! These days, with contemporary anesthesia and pain control, even major jaw surgery results in minimal to moderate pain. In the past, as the other doctor mentioned, there was more pain than today. However, there are still a great many very annoying problems with orthognathic surgery, including a lot of swelling, facial and oral numbness, nasal and sinus congestion and drainage, and a liquid diet.
Depends. While I do not perform the surgery, i was a patient once, so please understand that my information is anecdotal at best. The recovery is long, and i definitely remember being miserable for the first 2 weeks. The swelling took months to resolve. I had the surgery over 20 yrs ago and now I am happy i proceeded. Your surgeon can give you more balanced info than i can.
Mild-moderate. Less than expected considering the magnitude of the procedure. Dr. Bates explains very well.
Jaw surgery pain. Most patients have only moderate pain after orthognathic jaw surgery. Discomfort after your orthognathic jaw surgery can be easily managed with pain medication. A few patients will describe severe pain, and this is likely due to individual pain tolerance. This pain usually subsides in 7-14 days but in rare circumstances may persist for weeks or months after surgery.

Related Questions

Jaw expansion appliances for adults in braces? I've been told by 3 different orthodontists that due to overcrowding I need to have either 4 bicuspids pulled or have orthognathic surgery. They all told me I need to decide before I get the braces put on on

Adults . Adults can benefit from palatal expansion, but since all the growth sites are closed, it would require surgery for it to work. This procedure is limited to the upper arch and only nets you a small amount of space. Many orthodontists and oral surgeons can do a projection on how you may look after extractions and/or orthognathic surgery. Be aware, however, that your actual result may look considerably different than the projection. Read more...
Dr . Dr bill hang in your area is an expert in adult orthodontic expansion. I believe that it has been a long time (or very rare) that surgery or extractions have been needed in his practice. Read more...
Correct. The issue may be one of a narrow upper jaw. Expansion may create additional space, but it can only be done in a way that matches up the upper jaw to the lower. If the jaw is already normal then over-expanding is not advised and removing teeth would be needed. In some patients a combination of both is needed. Speak with your orthodontist to clarify. Read more...
Maybe not! We have been using a particular orthodontic appliance known as damon system to treat such cases with moderate to spectacular results without removal of teeth. I would recommend you eek out a damon provider with lots of experience to see if this option might work for you. Read more...
Caution. Seeking second opinions are an excellent way to proceed towards making an informed decision for what's best for you. The extraction of teeth is an evidenced-based approach that is superior treatment for patients with substantial crowding or protrusion. Typically, surgery and extractions are not interchangeable. In l.A., it might be advisable to visit an ortho dept. At usc, ucla, or loma linda. Read more...
Take advice. Three qualified specialist have all examined you and given you the same opinion. Take their advice. Select the practitioner you feel most comfortable with and follow his/her directions. Read more...

Can you tell me about orthognathic surgery, i.E.Surgery to move the position of your jaws?

Surgery. I assume that the newer orthodontic techniques have been ruled out by your orthodontist so costs vary from 50-100k including the hospital stay. Kaiser has some plans that will cover this and pay for the surgery even if it is not a kaiser hospital; do some research as I am unfamiliar with texas in relation to kaiser. Read more...
Orthognathic Surgery. Orthognathic surgery is a procedure that realigns your upper and lower jaws into an ideal configuration. It is performed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon in a hospital setting. Braces are usually part of the treatment, and will act to place the teeth in their ideal positions in preparation for the orthognathic surgery. Please consult with your local oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Read more...

What can be expected after orthognathic jaw surgery to correct underbite?

Ask your Surgeon. We have limited space to answer these types of questions and each case is different. With this extensive a procedure, this is something that you should have a sit down one on one discussion with not only the surgeon, but all other dentists involved (for example-orthodontist and general dentist). Good luck. Read more...
Jaws were moved! Your orthognatic surgery implied that the position of your jaw(s) were not normal including the underbite. If bone was removed from your maxilla , the correction is to be expected. Your orthodontist and surgeon planned to cut or add bone and fix your jaw(s) to the right position, including your bite. Read more...
Depends. Depends ion the type of surgery (there are many choices), how well the Orthodontic Specialist set up your "bite" for post-surgical fit, your overall health, your oral hygiene, and many other variables. Sit down with your Oral Surgeon to go over the anticipated surgery & post-op healing. Sit down w Orthodontist to discuss post-op finishing. Sit down w General Dentist to discuss tooth/bone repair. Read more...
Improvement. Improvement in bite and jaw line. Mild-moderate swelling and discomfort. Ask your oral surgeon for very specific outline. Read more...