What to feed a child with milk and egg allergy?

Many options. Fruits, veggies and grains of course. Protein foods- he/she may eat meats. Their is no reason to not eat meats with egg/milk allergy. Can also try soy products such as soy milk and tofu. Also almonds and almond milk. Walnuts and beans are good protein sources. How was the egg/milk allergy diagnosis made? How severe is the allergy? Did u c an allergist? If so ask them about eating peanuts.
Www.foodallergy.org. I agree with the above answer. Most food products are required to indicate whether there is milk or egg protein in the packaging. A good website to refer parents to is the food allergy and anaphylaxis network: www.Foodallergy.Org that provides food suggestions and recipes for children with multiple food allergies.

Related Questions

Milk and egg allergy! What foods can I eat that won't have them!?

Read lables. Food allergies vary from mild to life threatening. Most fall into the mild category with many vague effects on digestion or health. Specific food intolerance are best managed by educating yourself on what foods you should avoid.Processed foods may contain items you want to avoid, but the labels will list the contents. Various websites have lists you can download. Read more...

Can my child get vaccines if she has an egg allergy?

Yes. Only mmr, chickenpox, and flu vaccines have any egg in them at all, and the amount is so tiny that even in highly egg allergic children, serious reactions are extremely rare. Read more...
Yes. Yes - only MMR and flu shots may have been manufactured using egg embryos.However, good studies have shown that egg allergic children can safely receive MMR vaccine and the CDC says to do so. Influenza vaccineis different. This virus is also grown in eggs. The CDC states that people with a severe egg allergy shot not get flu shots. Read more...
Yes. Most of the children with egg allergy could tolerate the minute amount of egg in the influenza vaccine. A small percentage may have an allergic reaction (~1-3% risk) -- most allergic reaction tend to be mild . A pediatric allergist could give a test dose of a vaccine in the office and to make sure its safe to get a full vaccine. If your child is >4Y.O. There are low-egg flu shots on the market. Read more...
Yes. The only vaccine that may need to be avoided is influenza vaccine. However, only rare patients with a history of severe egg allergy have to avoid influenza vaccines (but can have all other routine vaccines). If you eat eggs without problems, then you may get influenza vaccination. See your doctor or allergist if you need help deciding if it is safe to receive the flu vaccine. Read more...
Yes. A few vaccines use eggs in the manufacturing process, but the remaining vaccines are fine for egg-allergic children. A parent should discuss with the doctor which vaccines to avoid. An allergist can test the child to see if he/she reacts to the vaccine, and then if there is no reaction, the child can get the vaccine at the allergist's office. Read more...
Yes. Most vaccines have no egg. Live virus vaccines and flu vaccines may contain small amount of egg. Aside from flu vaccine there is little risk of severe reaction. Flu vaccine can be administered in small additive amounts with close observation if there is a history of life threatening reaction to eggs. Read more...

Would a baby die of egg allergy if it took a uncooked egg?

Unlikely. Death due to food allergy is rare, but very unusual. If the baby is allergic to eggs, the reaction would be the same whether the egg is cooked or not. Read more...
No raw eggs. Eating uncooked eggs is a bad idea for young children for several reasons. There is a risk of infection from bactera on the egg. Also egg should always be introduced into a diet in it's cooked form since the allergens denature (break down) when cooked. Read more...
It is possible. The correct question is "could a baby die" not would a baby die". It depends on the severity of the allergy, the amount of raw egg swallowed, and the availability or unavailability of effective treatment. Effective treatment usually means Epipen (epinephrine) junior & a 911 call. The risk of death from anaphylaxis to foods is 1%. 99% survive and do just fine. That, however, is no reason for complacency. Read more...