Does trigeminal neuralgia run in families?

Not usually . Literature does not support a hereditary line to trigeminal neuralgia.
No genetic component. If a gene or genes that cause trigeminal neuralgia can be found, the diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia may be improved.
I would say no. Face pain is confusing to doctors. Is it nerve, tension, tumor or not? So, I just use 2 types; Tumors or aneurysm or NOT. 2nd type is common from the stresses and strains of life collects in the muscles which can NOT be surgically “fixed.” This stress type needs treatment too but with a combo recipe concept. Wellness, minerals, myofascial release, massage, aerobics, soaking, Chiro and acupuncture.
Not commonly. However, there are a minority of instances where this can occur. Like the others who have answered this question, most cases are sporadic. For many of these, it is possible to demonstrate a vascular structure making contact with the trigeminal nerve.

Related Questions

A few years ago I was diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia. I don't have it anymore. What are the chances of my tn coming back?

Depends. It depends on what caused it in the first place. Trigeminal neuralgia just means that there is pain caused by the trigeminal nerve itself misfiring. Usually this is a disease that is not cured, but must be managed chronically; congratulations on you no longer having it! Read more...
Unpredictable. Some people have an episode of trigeminal neuralgia and never have another. The longer the time between an initial episode and any subsequent one diminishes the likelihood that it will recur. Unfortunately, it is not all that predictable. Read more...
Help available. Modern surgical treatments now include needle balloon decompression, and can stop many of these episodes cold. Newer meds far more effective. Unlikely that this problem will re-emerge if you have been symptom-free for several years, but if it does come back, lots of new options. Read more...

Why don't nurses know about trigeminal neuralgia. I had a septoplasty to see if it would relieve it. Not one nurse knew what it was, ?

Trigeminal neuralgia. The context of your question is unfortunately not completely clear but i will give it my best - trigeminal neuralgia (tn) is usually diagnosed and treated by physicians and a lot of time requires a specialist. Tn stems from signals in the 5th cranial nerve which usually will be interpreted by your brain as pain arising from different areas of your face. Septoplasty will usually not address this. Read more...
Information. Trigeminal neuralgia is not all that common. It is entirely possible the a nurse may not have heard about it. However, if the hurse has been associated with a neurologist, or neurosurgeon, then for sure she would know about it. Read more...

Isn't there a test of some sort to tell if you've got trigeminal neuralgia?

No. Trig neuralgia is diagnosed based upon the history and the description of the pain. An MRI may show the loop of a blood vessel next to the trig nerve. This is thought to be the cause but you may still have tn even if the MRI does not show anything as the vessels are quite small. Read more...
Unfortunately no. There are no definitive tests for trigeminal neuralgia. It is a diagnosis made clinically. There are known treatments for this condition and you should consult a neurologist and/or a pain management physician. Read more...

If carbamazepine isn't working to treat my trigeminal neuralgia, what is a good drug to try next?

Varies. Carbamazepine used to be the main agent in treatment of trigeminal neuralgia years ago. We now have a multitude of anti-neuropathic agents with better side effect profile. To list a few, we have lyrica, (pregabalin) neurontin, topamax, etc. The choice is based on coexisting medical issues and other medications on which patient is placed. The physician can make this determination on a case by case basis. Read more...
Several. Drugs with best success rates: Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine. Next level: gabapentin, pregabalin. Another effective drug: baclofen. Further down the line: lacosamide, topiramate, lamotrigine, levetiracetam. Some add on treatments: topical or nasal lidocaine. The list goes on... Sometimes it isn't that the drug doesn't work, but it may not be used in the best manner. Read more...
Trileptal. is reported to be effective for trigeminal neuralgia. Some clinicians now prefer to use oxcarbazepine (Trileptal) as their first line drug for trigeminal neuralgia because of its reduced side effect profile. Unfortunately, about half of TN sufferers eventually become dissatisfied with medical therapy, explore surgical options. Read more...

I'm on carbamazepine for about a week or so and I don't like it. I'm taking it for Trigeminal Neuralgia, can I stop taking it since I haven't been on?

Careful. Hi, Thank you for your question. You haven't been on it too long to build a physical dependence but you should still discuss with your PCP this decision. They can start you on another medication at the same time. Hope that helps..contact me if you have any other questions :-) Dr. M. Read more...

How is trigeminal neuralgia diagnosed?

Clinical exam. Trigeminal neuralgia is a condition where sharp, electrical pain affects the face along one or more of the three branches of the trigeminal nerve. There is typical and atypical types of trigeminal neuralgia. Your neurosurgeon or neurologist should be able to examine you and make a diagnosis. Brain MRI scans are usually done to make sure there are no tumors or ms. Read more...
Clinical Diagnosis. By an expert, based on the patient's history and description of pain. There are several types of tn; most typical is sharp, shooting, electrical stabbing pain on one side of the face in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. Diagnostic studies, such as brain mri, do not make the diagnosis, but help to search for a cause. Read more...
History and exam. Other conditions like a tooth ache, muscle pain, and tumors must be ruled out. Then it is diagnosed with a history, examination, and sometimes local anesthetic. Read more...

How can trigeminal neuralgia be treated?

Yes. Generally trials of antiseizure medications can be beneficial. Some individuals fail such therapy and may otherwise benefit from neurosurgical procedures including gamma knife therapy. Read more...
Trigeminal neuralgia. Antiseziure medications such as tegretol have been used succesfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia for many years, in most cases, these drugs work where others fail. Surgical options such as microvascular decompression have also been used very succesfuly in cases where medications fail. Read more...
Multiple approaches. Most start with anti-seizure medication (for pain!). May also try other "neurological" non-seizure medications, but traditional pain killers usually not effective. Many have tried acupuncture, biofeedback, homeopathic, electrical stimulation and diet, with mixed success. Surgical procedures helpful: microvascular decompression yields highest rates of remission, though others helpful. Read more...
Treat with meds . Medications should always be tried first,see a neurologist,,intractable neuralgia,may also be treated with alcohol injection of the ganglion,though not always effective, Read more...

What are symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia?

Trigeminal Neuralgia. Good Day; Trigeminal Neuralgia is a chronic pain affecting the trigeminal nerve ( fifth cranial nerve) in the face. One notices mild to severe facial and frequent muscle spasms. you may even notice extreme, sporadic, sudden burning; the pain episodes could vary from a few seconds to a few minutes. Read more...
Sudden, sore, sided. Trigeminal Neuralgia is characterised by sharp, electric type pains, or spasms usually on one side of face lasting seconds to minutes, recurring repeatedly for some days or weeks then settling for some months. Thought to be caused by compression of the trigeminal nerve by a blood vessel it is most common in >50s. Diagnosis with Dr, for other causes see patient.info/doctor/trigeminal-neuralgia-pro. Read more...

What are symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia (tn)?

Pain. Trigeminal neuralgia is pain in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. It has 3 divisions- v1 to the forehead and upper face, v2 to the maxillary area under the eyes to the split of the lips, and v3 which is the lower jaw. Pain can occur in any one of the areas or a combination of them. Read more...
Severe Facial Pain. Sharp, shooting, electrical pain in one or more divisions of trigeminal nerve, usually unilateral. Tn-1 (classical) has exacerbations and remissions. Tn-2 may also have dull, achy pain in between electrical attacks. Facial sensation usually normal. Pain triggers include eating, talking, brushing teeth, touching the face. Pain often absent during sleep. Read more...
TN symptoms are . The attacks usually occur in brief paroxysms of electric shock-like, sharp (lancinating), stabbing, burning pain lasting a few seconds to one or two minutes which are separated by pain-free intervals of varying lengths.The pain is excruciating in intensity. Typically, a pain attack is accompanied by tic-like cramps or involuntary spasms of the facial muscles ("tic douloureux"). Read more...