7 doctors weighed in:

If I had asthma as a child am I prone to chest infections as an adult?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Hard to say

Many of those who wheeze during a variety of illnesses as infants and young kids grow out of this by school age (about 60%).
They may be labeled as having asthma but not fit the pattern later making the label suspect.These have normal lives.If you were hospitalized with recurrent wheezing and had true difficult to control asthma, you could certainly be more prone to lung problems in life.

In brief: Hard to say

Many of those who wheeze during a variety of illnesses as infants and young kids grow out of this by school age (about 60%).
They may be labeled as having asthma but not fit the pattern later making the label suspect.These have normal lives.If you were hospitalized with recurrent wheezing and had true difficult to control asthma, you could certainly be more prone to lung problems in life.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Gary Steven
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Possibly

People with active asthma, characterized by inflammation in the lungs, are more likely to get bronchitis.
Even though your symptoms may be well controlled, there may still be enough inflammation in the lungs to make you more susceptible. If you get bronchitis 2-3 or more times per year, you should get evaluated by an allergist to ensure that you're doing everything you can to prevent them.

In brief: Possibly

People with active asthma, characterized by inflammation in the lungs, are more likely to get bronchitis.
Even though your symptoms may be well controlled, there may still be enough inflammation in the lungs to make you more susceptible. If you get bronchitis 2-3 or more times per year, you should get evaluated by an allergist to ensure that you're doing everything you can to prevent them.
Dr. Gary Steven
Dr. Gary Steven
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Katharine Garnier
I agree, but even your personal doctor might be able to help you, you might need a pulmonary function test, and some allergy testing, which can be done by blood tests also. First step is to review your health with you personal physician to determine if your symptoms are consistent with asthma, or some other, possibly cardiac or gi, condition. You definitely should get this check, because even
Dr. Katharine Garnier
if asthma, untreated persistent inflammation can impact your lung function over time. See you doctor!
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