7 doctors weighed in:

Am I going to need a wheelchair because of ms?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Matt Malkin
Anesthesiology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Depends

There are multiple types of ms, with different prognosis.
There are also many meds available to slow or prevent progression and more being developed. A neurologist can evaluate and treat. Physical therapy and/or pmnr physician can help maximize your abilities if your symptoms necessitate it.

In brief: Depends

There are multiple types of ms, with different prognosis.
There are also many meds available to slow or prevent progression and more being developed. A neurologist can evaluate and treat. Physical therapy and/or pmnr physician can help maximize your abilities if your symptoms necessitate it.
Dr. Matt Malkin
Dr. Matt Malkin
Thank
3 doctors agree

In brief: It depends

The vast majority of patients with MS continue to walk and function for decades, with benefits now seen from long-term follow up of disease modifying therapies started early in the course.
Some individuals with aggressive disease or disease that hits brainstem or spinal cord pathways may have walking affected early and more severely strictly due to location of disease activity.

In brief: It depends

The vast majority of patients with MS continue to walk and function for decades, with benefits now seen from long-term follow up of disease modifying therapies started early in the course.
Some individuals with aggressive disease or disease that hits brainstem or spinal cord pathways may have walking affected early and more severely strictly due to location of disease activity.
Dr. Virginia Simnad
Dr. Virginia Simnad
Thank

In brief: Not necessarily

If your MS is fairly active with changes of relapses and MRI lesions, it is important that you take a potent medication such as Tysabri (natalizumab) or Gilenya.
In years past, before advent of effective treatment, wheelchairs seemed to be needed in 25-33%, but now, the percentages are far lower, and gait deterioration can be blunted by the correct medication.

In brief: Not necessarily

If your MS is fairly active with changes of relapses and MRI lesions, it is important that you take a potent medication such as Tysabri (natalizumab) or Gilenya.
In years past, before advent of effective treatment, wheelchairs seemed to be needed in 25-33%, but now, the percentages are far lower, and gait deterioration can be blunted by the correct medication.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Thank
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