What is the prognosis of vaginal cancer in DES daughter?

Significant. Women exposed while in the womb are 40 times more likely to develop vaginal or cervical cancer than women not exposed. The studies are primarily done on women who have not gone into menopause yet.
Vaginal cancer. I am unsure why you were exposed to des. The prognosis is very good but she needs radical surgery which, unfortunately, destroys fertility.

Related Questions

What's the prognosis of vaginal cancer?

Depends. Like most solid tumors the prognosis for your disease will depend upon the stage of the disease. The lower the stage, the less tumor there is and the more likely a good prognosis. As the stage of disease increases tumor burden increases and the less good the prognosis. Remember though that statistics are based on groups of people and do not necessarily apply to any one individual. Read more...

What is the prognosis of vaginal cancer? Can it spread t other areas other areas of the body?

It depends... Vaginal cancer size (of the tumor) and severity (of the changing cancer cells) play a huge role in prognosis. Pre-cancerous and early cancerous vaginal lesions are usually curable. The best bet is to catch it early, be treated by a gyn-oncologist and follow their recommendations. Read more...
Good prognosis. It likes to spread usually locally first, so it needs to be treated locally. Prognosis depends on stage and extent of disease involvement. In very advance stage it can metastasize to other organs. Read more...

What is the prognosis of having vaginal cancer?

Depends. There are many factors which play into prognosis. Staging of the disease is very important. Staging classifies the diseases into stages 0 through IV depending on the extent of the tumor (t), whether the cancer has spread to lymph nodes (n) and whether it has spread to distant sites (m for metastasis). Stage helps to predict prognosis and helps to determine the most appropriate treatment course. Read more...

How common is vaginal cancer?

Rare. The rate is 1 in 3, 300 people, or 0.03% of the population. Risk factors for vaginal cancer include: history of abnormal pap smear, hpv warts, previous hpv infection, ano-rectal cancer, vaginal intraepithial neoplasia, and multiple sexual partners. Smokers have a harder time fighting hpv infections and thus have higher rates of vaginal cancer. Read more...
Rare. There are fewer than 1000 cases/year in the us. See this site for more info. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0002479/. Read more...

How common is vaginal cancer?

Not very. According to the american cancer society, there are estimated 2680 cases diagnosed in 2012, which is about 1/100 of gynecological malignancies. Read more...
Vaginal cancer. Very rare. It is 1/10th as common as cervical cancer. About 1200-1500 cases per year. Read more...

What’s new in vaginal cancer research?

Several things. Scientists are learning more about tumor suppressor genes, refining radiation therapy techniques, and developing new procedures for reconstruction after surgery. Read more...
Not much right now. There are no open protocols through the gog (gynecology oncology group). Researchers are studying the role of hpv in vaginal cancer and it appears that there is some role for chemotherapy but since it is less common than ovarian and cervical cancers there is less research. Read more...

How can you know you have vaginal cancer?

Bleeding/GYN exam. This often presents with no symptoms. The most common symptom is irregular vaginal bleeding, like after intercourse or between periods, or postmenopausal. Other symptoms are pain on urination, pain during intercourse, or pelvic pain. Probably the best way to find out if you have this is by routine gyn exam, pelvic exam, pap smear, colposcopy, etc.. Des exposure predisposes to this cancer. Read more...
Vaginal cancer. Your doctor would determine whether or not you have vaginal cancer. It is extremely rare. It can be found at early stages by a pap smear and biopsy. At later stages, it is seen and felt as a mass on pelvic exam. Read more...

What do you recommend for vaginal cancer?

Vaginal cancer. It depends on location and stage. A proximal (vaginal cuff) cancer that is stage i can be treated very well with surgery. Otherwise, chemo radiation is used unless it extends onto the vulva. Read more...