Are all brca gene mutations hereditary? Can you share some sources?

BRCA mutations. The majority of brca mutations are inherited from your mother or father. There are some which occur de novo(without inheritance). There is considerable information on the website for myriad- this is the company which has been doing the commercial testing in the usa.
Hereditary cancer. Women w/ 2+ immediate family members w/ a hx of breast/ovarian CA at 50% chance of developing breast cancer. If you have it, get screened with CA-125 blood test, ultrasound, mammogram/MRI, usually starting at age 30. Surgery after childbearing.

Related Questions

Can you tell me, are all brca gene mutations hereditary?

Good question. . The answer is no, a small number of patients with early onset breast cancer who carry a bad brca 1 or 2 mutation develop it "de novo", meaning that it started with them (after all, someone has to be the first to have it). Depending at which stage in development it happens, it may affect them to a different degree and may or may not be passed to their children. Some other cancer syndromes.. Read more...
Yes. Women w/ 2+ immediate family members w/ a hx of breast/ovarian CA at 50% chance of developing breast cancer. If you have it, get screened with CA-125 blood test, ultrasound, mammogram/MRI, usually starting at age 30. Surgery after childbearing. Read more...

Can you tell me how I could find the interview I saw about brca gene mutation?

Information's handy. There are plenty of evidence-based sites dealing with the BRCA genes and their mutations. Don't chase down a particular interview. The science is well-established. Be discerning and get with your physician if you feel you need to be tested. Read more...

Please I need help...i want to know the cost of brca gene mutation? And does the test found in all the countaries

Variably expensive. These are very expensive tests and they are not necessary or indicated unless you have a close family history of breast cancer. Even then, having the mutation does not mean that you will definitely have cancer. Better to do annual mammograms and self exams. The tests are available in the US and many other countries but not everywhere and may cost US$2000-4000. Read more...

Are people who are born with brca gene at a higher risk for recurrence of cancer too?

Not Exactly. Breast cancer may recur either in the breast ("local recurrence") or elsewhere in the body (distant metastasis). The risk of metastasis varies from very low to high, and is correlated with the stage of the cancer. Local recurrence following lumpectomy and radiation therapy is less than 5%. However, brca(+) people do have a (much) higher risk of developing a second primary breast cancer. Read more...
Yes! If you have a mutation in the brca gene, you are at higher risk of getting a first cancer, and of having recurrence of a prior treated cancer. The brca gene helps cells repair themselves when they get damanged. Cells in people with a mutated brca gene can't repair themselves, so they are more likely to become cancerous. I keep a very close eye on my cancer patients with brca mutations! Read more...

If two members of my immediate family developed breast cancer, should I get tested for the brca gene?

Possibly. It's always better to test the family members who have breast cancer if possible. If they are first degree relatives (mother, daughter or sister) and one was under age 50 at diagnosis, you might meet criteria for brca testing. It's best to meet with a genetic counselor who can help guide you and your family so the correct people are tested. There are non-brca mutations as well. Read more...
Maybe. It would be best if the family member with the breast cancer gets brca testing. If it was positive then you definitely need to be tested too. If she was negative, then the cancer was probably not related to brca gene mutations and you won't need to be tested. You still will be at higher for breast ca. If your family member was not willing or able to test, then you may want to be tested. Read more...
Depends. It would depend on your heritage and also at what age were your immediate family members diagnosed. I would seek the advice of a genetic counselor. Read more...
Absolutely. Women w/ 2+ immediate family members w/ a hx of breast/ovarian CA at 50% chance of developing breast cancer. If you have it, get screened with CA-125 blood test, ultrasound, mammogram/MRI, usually starting at age 30. Surgery after childbearing. Read more...

Mother had breast ca at 53, her paternal cousin had it at 47. Her cousin's mother who she is not related to also had it at 65. Likely brca gene?

Possible but not. ..Enough info to say for sure. Your mother or her cousin should visit a cancer genetics counselor who will take a complete family history and do a limited physical exam. Based on that, they can estimate their odds of carrying a high risk gene such as brca and test them. They also estimate their risk of getting cancer so that they have a head start on it. If neither can or will go, you should. Read more...

When I have my daughter tested for brca gene? My husband's sister was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer.  no other history of b.C. In our families.

Good idea. Always better to know than remain in ignorance. She can always get bc advice if brca gene testing ispositive. Read more...
Not yet. I am sorry to hear about your sister-in-law. In general, when we are concerned about the hereditary form of breast cancer, we test the affected person first. If they don't harbor the gene, there is no need to test anyone else. Keep in mind that 85-90% of all breast cancer cases are not hereditary. Even if your sister-in-law has the gene, your husband has a 50% chance as well, and your daughter 25%. Read more...
Not just yet. A single person with breast cancer in the family is not generally considered a reason for brca testing. A history of multiple indviduals with breast or ovarian cancer or both is usually required. Onset of cancers at an early age and breast cancer in male family members are also important. If your doc feels there is risk you and your daughter should receive genetic counciling before tests are done. Read more...
Not now. If your sister in law had cancer before age 45 or had a triple negative cancer before age 60, she fits nccn criteria for brca testing even without family history. She needs to test first and if positive, your husband should test and if he is positive, then you test your girl. Cancer can jump an individual but the gene cannot. Hope all goes well with all in the family. Read more...

My mother had breast cancer at 54 and her cousin was diagnosed at 45. Is this likely caused by the brca gene? My insurance won't pay for it.

Possible. It is hard to say without a full family history but your relatives did have cancer at a young age. Per nccn guidelines, both are candidates for testing (assuming they are still alive). They would be the best subjects for testing and then you may or may not need to. If they can't or won't, i advise you talk to your doc to see if a genetic counselor can see you and decide on the proper testing. Read more...
BRCA. Probably not. The patient to be tested is the cousin due to age at diagnosis. You do not qualify because you're risk of having the gene is so low. That's a good thing! Read more...
Nope! If you don't have breast or ovarian cancer yourself, then you need a family history of breast cancer in two close relatives (parent, sibling, aunt, granparent, niece) on the same side of the family, or one close relative diagnosed with breast cancer before age 45. Your mother's cousin doesn't qualify as a close relative. Ask to see a genetic counselor to better define your risk. Read more...