How many times can genital herpes be spread?

Often. Every time a person with active herpetic genital lesions has sex with someone who has not previously encountered this organism it can be spread. There is also evidence that persons without active lesions who shed the virus in the vaginal secretions can also spread the virus. The virus, once you get it, is with you for life and can be spread every time you have sex with a new partner.

Related Questions

Does someone with genital herpes commonly have outbreaks several times a week?

Stress. During periods of extreme stress, it is possible to have multiple outbreaks in close succession. Treatment with oral antivirals may help in that case. See your doctor about this issue. Read more...

Will genital herpes be spread to somebody with cold sores?

Herpes Transmission. Herpes simplex virus (hsv) has two types: type i generally infects the mouth and produces "fever blisters". Type ii more commonly is genital. However, performing or receiving oral sex with someone infected with hsv i or ii can result in infection. There are blood tests that can quickly determine if you've been infected with either strain. Antivirals help to reduce shedding and infection. Read more...

Genital herpes how can it spread?

Herpes . Herpes is transmitted skin to skin from the site on your skin where you are infected. Read more...

How is genital herpes typically spread?

Sexual contact. Sexual contact with a person with active herpes can spread the infection to a partner, either genitally or orally. Some people have an active lesion and don't know it. If you don't know your partner, use a condom! Read more...

How is genital herpes generally spread?

Direct Contact. Genital herpes is essentially spread by direct contact with an infectious area. It is so common primarily due to its ability to infect another even in the absence of any sores. So, that means that genital herpes can be spread even if you or your partner don't see any sores - orally or genitally. Valtrex (valacyclovir) has been shown to reduce, not eliminate the risk for asymptomatic transmission. Read more...