Could pulmonary embolism 'go away'?

Yes.... A pulmonary embolism is a blood clot in the blood vessels in the lung. Symptoms range from no symptoms to death, depending in the size and location of the blood clot. Once the blood clot is no longer increasing in size, the body's own system will "heal" the clot by reabsorbing it. Blood thinners allow this to happen, by making it impossible for the blood clot to continue to increase in size.

Related Questions

On xarelto for 2 months since diagnosis w/ pulmonary embolism. Pain in left arm and left leg still, is that normal? Will it go away? Should I be worried?

Pain. I doubt your pain is related to pulmonary embolism or xarelto. As far as whether you should worry or not, i cannot tell you without further history and exam. Read more...
Talk to your doctor. Not sure why you have pain in the left arm since this is unusual with PE and suggests something else going on. Even if you had DVT in left leg the pain should be gone by now. Time to reevaluate your situation. Read more...

Started micronor last week, and I feel like I got hit by a PMS truck. I'm an emotional disaster. How long does this take to go away? Can't take regular ocps because of hx of pulmonary embolism.

Stop. I would consider stopping your norethindrone and starting the copper IUD. Women with problems with reaction to hormone preparations can be well served with a non-hormonal copper IUD. You also have a history of depression and need to consult psychiatry to rule out bipolar depression etc. You also need a workup for hypercoagulability,, protein C, S, Factor V Leiden. We are on your side, good luck. Read more...
Condoms? You may have to use other contraceptive methods. Female Condoms, Antispermicidal Gels, IUD . Speak to Gynecologist for other treatment options! Read more...

Could you get a pulmonary embolism 2 times?

Yes. In fact, some research suggests that pulmonary embolisms (small clots to the lung) may occur routinely after surgeries and in other situations but be small enough that symptoms are never felt. Because large pulmonary embolisms can be dangerous, testing is usually indicated to determine if there is a predisposition to form clots and if recurrent clots form, prolonged anticoagulation is indicated. Read more...
Absolutely. Especially if you have the same risk factors, be it inherited, immobility, birth control pills, smoking etc. If you get it a second time, you should take blood thinners for life. Read more...

When pulmonary embolism happens in the lungs, what is actually going on?

PE. Clot traveled from somewhere to the right atrium and if able to the right ventricle, outside to the arteries of the lungs and cause blockade of flow as they go to the arteries wherein the size of the clot can't go through. Read more...

I've had taccycardia for over a year. Could this be a pulmonary embolism?

Not really. A pe would present as cough, bloody chest pain, and shortness of breath. Now, it could be associated with tachycardia in an acute situation, but you're talking about a year of rapid heart rate. I'm assuming you've been seen and evaluated by a physician.If not, do so. Good luck. Read more...
Possibly. While some patients do have something called chronic pulmonary embolism, the odds of having that without ever being diagnosed with DVT are small. You should be discussing this with your doctor so they can work you up for other causes as well (hyperthyroidism for example). Read more...

Would chest pain from a pulmonary embolism be constant and get worse or could it come and go?

Either one. Usually rapid heart beat is present. Usually rapid, labored breathing is present. Is there a swollen, red, painful leg? Coughing? Coughing blood? X-ray? Cardiogram? Blue lips & fingers? Read more...

Could my wheezing be from a pulmonary embolism. Help?

Not likely. Pulmonary embolism causes chest pain, shortness of breath from loss of oxygen and a feeling of "impending doom". It usually comes on suddenly and is not gradual. Wheeezing is more likely due to asthma, bronchitis, allergies, etc. Read more...

If I feel fatigued could I possibly have pulmonary embolism?

Poss. but unlikely. The symptoms of fatigue can have many possible causes and most of these potential causes are more common than a pulmonary embolism (pe) being the cause. A pe usually causes sudden and severe shortness of breath, or death. More likely causes of fatigue include poor sleep, thyroid disorders, anemia, blood sugar issues, stress, anxiety, depression, infections, etc. Follow up with your doctor. Read more...
Any risk factor? Fatigue can happen in any diseases. If you feel fatigued and have symptoms such as breathing problem, rapid heart rate, or have the risk factors such as prolonged trip, bed rest for long time, pregnancy, inherited blood disease, history of blood clot in legs, on birth control pill or hormone, cancer, or recent surgery, see your doctor soon. Age risk:every 10 years of age after 60 doubles the risk. Read more...
Any risk factor? Patients with pulmonary embolism are more than fatigued. There is often fast heart rat, fast breathing rate, shortness of breath' chest pai, coughing up blood and other symptoms. Fatigue alone is non-specific and can happen with anything. Read more...
Fatigue alone?... Do you have any risk factors for pulmonary embolism? There are some patients who have pe asymptomatically but they usually, have some risk factor. Risk factors include things like prolonged immobility, trauma, congenital clotting defects, etc. You should see your doctor asap or go to an er if you think you might have this, especially if you have any other symptoms like acute shortness of breath. Read more...