What kind of pain when you have incisional hernia?

Dull pain first. At the sit of incision may be a dull pain with bulge first, then pain and size increases with time , able to push it in at first later, may gives complications like severe pain unable to reduce as it gets incaciraioned ( even stragulation ) causing bowel obstrucion including gangrene of gut.
If you don't know .. If you don't have any symptoms you probably don't have to worry. Most hernias that are asymptomatic do not need to be .fixed. Symptoms such as cramps abdominal pain, nausea, bloating or a lump that bulges under your incision when u cough are possible symptoms of a hernia. See your doctor if concerned .
Not alway. Ypu may or may not have pain. Usually you see a bulge where the scar is.

Related Questions

What's the type of pain that goes along with a incisional hernia?

At hernia location. It is common to experience intermittent discomfort, sharp pain, and/or pressure at the location of the lump or lumps along the old incision. See a general surgeon to define and align goals for repair, and options for repair. Read more...
Depends . Everyone has pain right after but it all depends on your hernia and how you feel pain. Some are better in 2-3 days. Others take 3 weeks. Some people complain of pulling or tugging from the mesh long term. Most people however do well with no complaints. . Read more...

How do I avoid making an incisional hernia worse?

Watch Your "Weight" Anything that increases abdominal pressure can accentuate the hernia. Therefore, obesity, heavy lifting, core exercises, chronic cough (smoking) are but a few factors that can worsen an incisional hernia. If you are otherwise in good health and are having symptoms from the hernia, surgery should be considered--please see a surgeon to get a formal evaluation, if you haven't already. Good luck! Read more...
Avoid weight gain. Maintaining or losing weight and minimizing extraordinary abdominal wall stress is critical to avoid hernia exacerbation. Read more...
Avoid straining. . Things that can make hernias worse: smoking, heavy lifting, obesity, diabetes , constipation etc. practice safe lifting techniques. . Read more...

I have an incisional hernia and keep passing out due to pain what should I do?

See your surgeon. wear support brace, avoid putting stress on it , take otc pain meds including Tylenol and aleve since they work differently can take together. you should not have this pain see your surgeon. Read more...

How will I know what does an incisional hernia feel like and what are the symptoms?

Pain and lump. Usually discomfort and swelling or lump forms under the scar at the site of prior surgery. Physical examination with your doctor is the best place to start. Read more...
If you don't know .. If you don't have any symptoms you probably don't have to worry. Most hernias that are asymptomatic do not need to be .fixed. Symptoms such as cramps abdominal pain, nausea, bloating or a lump that bulges under your incision when u cough are possible symptoms of a hernia. See your doctor if concerned . Read more...

What a lap incisional hernia?

Hernia. It is a hernia, or protrusion of abdominal contents through a previous laparoscopic surgery access site. They can and should be repaired if symptomatic, as there is risk of incarceration (getting stuck) in these small hernias. Read more...
Laparoscopic repair. Laparoscopic incisional hernia is repair of a hernia associated with a surgical incision by means of laparoscopic techniques. This entails use of small incisions, trocars, instruments that are placed through the trocars and repair of the hernia with the use of synthetic mesh or a biologic graft. Suture reapair is also possible but is typically reinforced by the mesh or graft. Read more...
Laparoscopic? Usually refers to repair of an incisional hernia from the inside of the abdomen issuing small cameras Traditionally repair of hernias was done as an 'open' procedure from the outside. Lap hernias often have less pain and a wicker return to activities but carry some additional risks. . Read more...

Can bloatedness be due to incisional hernia?

Yes, if. Your incisional hernia becomes intermittently incarcerated and cause intestinal obstruction. If this is the case, you need to have surgical repair soon. Consult a surgeon for specific advice. Read more...
Yes. . Especially if intestine is being squeezed in the hole ( hernia) in your abdominal muscles. But there are many other things that can cause bloating. See your MD if not getting better. Read more...

Incisional hernia. Is the mesh uncomfortable?

No. Once you heal from the surgery, you shouldn't feel a thing. The mesh should be placed inside the hernia for maximum effectiveness, and you can't feel it in there. Read more...
Depends. There are many types of mesh so part of the answer depends on what type of mesh is used some mesh is absorbable or partly absorbable so that can leave less foreign body. Mostly i would answer this one no. Read more...
Depends. This depends on the type of mesh, and the technique and location of placement of the mesh. Meshes that bridge a hernia defect should not be super lightweight, a technique common technique with a laparoscopic approach. I'd the defect is closed, a lighter weight mesh can be used more safely. Surgeons with interest in hernia disease are on the Americas Hernia Society website. Hope this helps! Read more...
Usually not. Mesh that is placed in the proper location and with good technique should basically be imperceptible. Currently used materials are thin and pliable, yet strong, so if placed well should be associated with a good repair and no discomfort related to the mesh. Read more...
Can be. . Some people complain of pulling or tugging from the mesh. Very rarely people have pain. Most people however do well with no complaints. . Read more...

Does incisional hernia always require surgery?

No. But most do or they enlarge and cause other trouble. Risk - benefit is the calculation. Includes what surgery was original. Where is the incision? How large is the current defect? Contain bowel?Etc. Read more...
No. Not necessarily. If it does not bother you, is not increasing in size and does not incarcerate (get stuck) then you do not absolutely need to fix it. If, however, the above things are happening or it is a larger hernia thru a small defect in the muscle then it is better to fix it early vs later. Read more...
Most do. The great majority of incisional hernias require repair. Those that are large enough to allow structures like bowel to slip in and out easily and are associated with no symptoms at all can have surgery deferred. Unfortunately, over time, most people develop symptoms and require surgery. Also, larger hernias require larger fixes and the natural history is that incisional hernias tend to enlarge. Read more...