13 doctors weighed in:

What are “stim behaviors” and why does the person with asperger’s disorder do them?

13 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Holmes
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
6 doctors agree

In brief: Comfort

Self-stimulating behaviors are a variety of things that people engage in when they are uncomfortable or anxious in their environment.
They can be automatic and like a habit, and can done in an unconscious manner. When people with autistic symptoms do them, it is a way of them coping with their environment by coping with stressful situations and getting a reduction in anxiety.

In brief: Comfort

Self-stimulating behaviors are a variety of things that people engage in when they are uncomfortable or anxious in their environment.
They can be automatic and like a habit, and can done in an unconscious manner. When people with autistic symptoms do them, it is a way of them coping with their environment by coping with stressful situations and getting a reduction in anxiety.
Dr. William Holmes
Dr. William Holmes
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Dr. Alan Ali
Psychiatry
3 doctors agree

In brief: Stimming

Is repetitive body movements such as hand flapping, which is a stereotyped behaviors for self-stimulation.

In brief: Stimming

Is repetitive body movements such as hand flapping, which is a stereotyped behaviors for self-stimulation.
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali
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Dr. Frank Gaskill
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
2 doctors agree

In brief: Aspergers

Stimming is typically a expression of anxiety but is also a self-soothing strategy.
I typically do not try to make these behaviors stop but channel them into more socially acceptable situations. The best approach is through cognitive behavioral therapy but also education and helping aspies understand why they do what they do. Here is my take on the spectrum. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xg1n.

In brief: Aspergers

Stimming is typically a expression of anxiety but is also a self-soothing strategy.
I typically do not try to make these behaviors stop but channel them into more socially acceptable situations. The best approach is through cognitive behavioral therapy but also education and helping aspies understand why they do what they do. Here is my take on the spectrum. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xg1n.
Dr. Frank Gaskill
Dr. Frank Gaskill
Thank
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