What to expect in an infant after febrile seizure?

Sleep. Following the seizure, expect the child to sleep for a variable period of time, 1/2 to several hours. When the child awakens expect them to act normally.
Febrile convulsion. These are very scary for the parent but have no long term ill effects. They may recur with future febrile illnesses in children < 3-4 yrs old . There is no relationship with development of epilepsy later in life.

Related Questions

A hard lump behind an infants ear, it grows. Not to fast but still grows, she often gets febrile seizures, and sweats a lot. Does this sound scary?

Probably not. Usually these are small lymph nodes (glands) or a small cyst and generally are benign. I can not see it being related to the other issues. Ask your pediatrician. Read more...
How old is pt. I will like to know how old is your child. There may be benign lymph nodes behind the ear. Febrile seizure may not be linked to it. What is 'sweating a lot'. Is it related to activities, eating, or weather changes, more. Read more...

What's a febrile seizure in a baby?

Certain illnesses. Children are at risk for seizures during certain types of illnesses. Most famous are roseola, shigella, measles, but also flu and urine infections. The risk is highest between 1 and 3 years of age, and there may be a familial tendency. Nearly all will outgrow the risk and do well. Read more...
Febrile seizure. A febrile seizure is a combo of 1. fever 2. loss of consciousness 3. convulsive seizure. It normally occurs in a small child, once or twice, and has a very good prognosis. http://www.neurocuro.com/febrile-seizure/ Read more...

If my older child had febrile seizures should I expect my newborn to have them, too?

No. Although there is a higher incidence of febrile convulsions in children whose parents have had them it is more likely your child won't. Febrile convulsions are a scary but not dangerous condition. Read more...
No. I would not expect a newborn to have febrile seizures. Seizures with fever have their highest incidence in the 6 month to two year age group and usually subside by age 5. Having one child with febrile seizures will make you more aware as a parent for the nuances in the sibling. I agree they are scary but are not dangerous. Read more...
No, but... If a sibling has experienced febrile seizures, it is more likely the other siblings will have them, but it is still a rather uncommon occurrence, and though it is scary to experience it should not be considered to be a sign of something ominous. Good luck! Read more...

Can a man have a febrile seizure?

No. If an adult male had a seizure with a fever, it would not be classified as a febrile seizure and he would have a thorough evaluation. Read more...
No. True febrile seizures occur in children from 4 months to 6 years. In adults, a fever may precipitate a seizure if there is an abnormality in the brain that exists. The fever might lower a persons threshold for having a seizure but is not considered a febrile seizure. Read more...

What sort of disorder is a febrile seizure?

Childhood condition. A febrile seizure is a seizure which occurs in a child, usually between 6 months and 6 years of age, that is associated with a fever. They generally occur when the child's temperature changes quickly, either going up or coming down. While very scary to parents, most simple febrile seizures themselves do not cause any problems for the child. They have a 30% recurrence risk. Read more...
Febrile seizure. A febrile seizure is a generalized seizure that occurs in a small child in the setting of a fever. Normally it affects children between 1-4 years old. http://www.neurocuro.com/febrile-seizure/ Read more...

Is a febrile seizure followed by a non-febrile seizure?

Not typically. Febrile sz do not increase the risk of non febrile seizures unless they last longer than 5 minutes. If a febrile sz is followed by a non febrile seizure, obviously that child needs to be seen by a neurologist for further evaluation. Read more...
Little risk. there is no increase in epilepsy risk after a single febrile seizure. Even with multiple simple febrile seizures the risk goes from 1/2 to 1 percent. Read more...

What should I do if my child is having a febrile seizure?

Place on side. While he is convulsing, place him on his side. Don't try to stop the convulsions and don't put anything in his mouth. Also keep an eye on the clock. If the seizure lasts longer than 5 minutes, call 911. After the seizure has stopped, take your child to a physician immediately to rule out the presence of a serious infection. Read more...
Remain calm. Febrile seizures are very common. They reflect a toxic state of the child. Most important is to protect the breathing. Place the child down on his side and keep the mouth clear. Do not stick anything into the mouth. Extend the chin forward, wipe the mouth, and be sure he can get good fresh air. A rectal gel is available as well as oral tablet that can dissolve and soon a nasal spray. Read more...
First aide. Place your child on the floor. In case your have to call 911 there will not be possible fall from bed. Turn the child on side. If the mouth is open, place something soft between the teeth and sweep the mouth to remove any contents. If the mouth is clenched, do not pry the teeth open, you might break them. Call 911 if the seizure lasts more than 2-3 min. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Febrile seizure?

Febrile Seizure. Seizure that occurs due to fever. Seen in children under 5 yrs of age. Benign type of seizure that resolves without medication. Read more...