4 doctors weighed in:

What causes endometriosis to develop in rectal area?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Cindy Mosbrucker
Obstetrics & Gynecology - Urogynecology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Genetics

We are now learning that genes have a significant role in determining who gets endo, and how severe it is.
Somewhere between 10-20% of women with endo have bowel involvement. Rectal and sigmoid locations are the most frequent sites for bowel endo, and it causes pain with bms all month long. You usually can't see endo on colonoscopy so many women arent diagnosed by GI docs to whom they're referred.

In brief: Genetics

We are now learning that genes have a significant role in determining who gets endo, and how severe it is.
Somewhere between 10-20% of women with endo have bowel involvement. Rectal and sigmoid locations are the most frequent sites for bowel endo, and it causes pain with bms all month long. You usually can't see endo on colonoscopy so many women arent diagnosed by GI docs to whom they're referred.
Dr. Cindy Mosbrucker
Dr. Cindy Mosbrucker
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Dr. Nicholas Fogelson
Totally agree. Colonoscopy is very unreliable when it comes to diagnosing endometriosis. I have had patients who bled from their rectum on a monthly basis because of endometriosis growing through the wall of their bowel, only to have a "negative" colonoscopy. When a patient has these symptoms, they have bowel endometriosis irrespective of the colonscopy findings.
Dr. John Jarrett
Fertility Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It can be anywhere

One of the main theories as to the cause of endometriosis is the flow of menstrual fluid through the fallopian tubes at the time of the menses.
If that fluid, and those cells, fall into the area of the rectum, the cells can implant and grow in that area.

In brief: It can be anywhere

One of the main theories as to the cause of endometriosis is the flow of menstrual fluid through the fallopian tubes at the time of the menses.
If that fluid, and those cells, fall into the area of the rectum, the cells can implant and grow in that area.
Dr. John Jarrett
Dr. John Jarrett
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Dr. Nicholas Fogelson
The answer to this is not entirely known. Retrograde menstruated blood will collect in the cul de sac and therefore in the area of the rectum, and over time through recurrent inflammation may invade into the wall. There are other theories as well, such as spontaneous conversion of typical peritoneal cells into endometriosis cells through a process called metaplasia.
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