Is asd (atrial septal defect) hereditary?

Yes, but complex. There is a hereditary component to atrial septal defects. Some patients with known genetic syndromes have ASDs as well. In most cases though, the mechanism of heritability is complex. Please discuss these issues with your physician to determine your specific risks.
Not completely. The genetic influence of congenital heart defects travels on several different genes & there is some risk for first degree relatives (offspring, sibs). The risk for offspring to have some heart defect (not the same) runs ~4% while it jumps to 6-8% if both parents have some form of defect. Of some interest, there is a basic 4% risk of some unexpected outcome for any pregnancy. (defect, premi, illness).

Related Questions

Hello docs, is asd (atrial septal defect) hereditary?

In some cases. Some cases of atrial septal defect have a genetic component. An example is holt-oram syndrome which is caused by a mutation in the tbx5 gene. Tbx5 codes for a protein called t-box 5, which is a transcription factor active during fetal development and is important in the proper development of the heart and the upper extremities. Almost certainly, there are other important genes. Read more...

Is asd (atrial septal defect) known as a hereditary condition?

Possibly. While there are some reports of familial clusters, generally it is a congenital condition affecting caused by a developmental defect. Read more...
There is. A higher likelihood of an ASD in a sibling or a child of a mom with add so yes, there is a genetic component. Read more...

Help please! Is asd (atrial septal defect) a hereditary condition?

Yes (in a sense) We are only just beginning to understand the genetics of congenital heart disease (chd). There are some specific genetic syndrome associated with asds. In addition, simply having an ASD does impart an increased risk--though small--of having children with chd. So yes, having chd is heritable, but in a multifactorial way (i.e. Not a single gene defect in many cases). Read more...

Please help! I have an atrial septal defect (asd)?

Treatable. The importance of an ASD depends on the location in the septum and on the size of the asd. Small asds may cause no problems. Larger asds may require treatment. The most common ASD is an ostium secundum asd. Often, this can be treated by implanting a device in the ASD by catheter, sealing the hole. If the ASD is very large, or other than a secundum defect, surgery may be necessary. Read more...
No problem. Can do. There are 3 basic types. Sinus venosus asd, primum asd, secundum asd, and patent foramen ovale. Tiny pfo's and secundum may be attempted to close with the clamshell. Large secundums, primums and sinus venosus asd' as well as unroofed coronary sinus defect require surgical closure. Need echo and cardiac cath. And cta to r/o partial pulmonary venous return anomalies. Read more...

I have an 11mm unrepaired atrial septal defect. It has grown larger since it was discovered in 2011. Do asds ever shrink?

In children, yes. In children we do see asds get smaller with age. If this question is in regards to the adult heart, you would need to contact your cardiologist. Read more...
Not usually. Over time the atrium and septal defect can enlarge but probably never shrink without repair. Read more...
Do ASDs shrink? No tarakaufm38, they do not shrink, but they can be closed quite easily without a surgery if they are big enough to require that. The key to deciding whether they need to be closed hinges on whether the right side of the heart (right atrium and right ventricle) are dilated from the extra blood flow going there through the asd. This dilation will resolve after device placement in the cath lab. Read more...
Possibly But... Some asds do spontaneously close. But they are generally much smaller. An 11mm ASD is unlikely to spontaneously close, especially if it's gotten larger you mentioned. Read more...

Does atrial septal defect (asd) or ventricular septal defect (vsd) occur in some population groups more than others?

Yes. ASD is more common in females 2-3/1, while vsd is only slightly more common. A variety of heart defects are frequently seen in chromasome defects, trisomies, deletions etc. Some asian populations have a form of vsd at higher frequency. There are polygenic factors that increase risk within families with heart defects for offspring with a lesion. Read more...
Yes. Some types of chromosomal defects and some syndromes (not necessarily related to chromosome abnormalities) may have higher incidences of specific heart defects including asd's and vsd's. In general 8 out of every 1000 babies born will have a heart defect that will vary from the very simple to the very complex. Read more...