Celiac disease, gluten intolerance, or ulcers, how do I know which I have?

Get tested. Discuss your concerns with your physician. A series of blood tests can begin the process but additional GI tests including endoscopy ( looking through a scope) or intestinal biopsy may be needed as the workup progresses.These studies could confirm or exclude this diagnosis.

Related Questions

Can you explain the differences between celiac disease, gluten intolerance, and wheat or gluten allergy?

Intol. isn't allergy. Celiac disease (gluten allergy) is a big allergic reaction to gluten (a protein in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, etc...). Wheat allergy includes allergy to non-gluten parts or wheat. Gluten intolerance is not an allergic reaction, but does lead to tummy symptoms such as gassiness, loose stools, etc... Gluten intolerance does not cause damage to the intestinal lining like celiac disease does. Read more...
Celiac disease. Celiac disease and gluten intolerance are the same disease, but gluten oe wheat allergy is ige mediated allergy. Read more...
Differs considerably. Consider wheat as a composite of many proteins all of could trigger a simple allergic response like hives. Intolerance is similar. The reaction clears when the protein trigger is gone. In celiac disease the body produces antibodies to various gluten proteins that mistakenly attack intestinal tissue & cause tissue damage. That tissue injury can continue as long as there are circulating antibodies. Read more...

Is rashes usually a symptom of celiac disease/gluten intolerance or a wheat allergy?

DH. Dermatitis herpetiformis is an extremely itchy rash made of bumps and blisters. The rash is chronic, which means it continues over a long period of time. Dermatitis herpetiformis usually begins in people age 20 and older, although children may sometimes be affected. It is seen in both men and women. The cause is unknown. However, dermatitis herpetiformis is frequently linked to gluten sensitivity. Read more...

How can you treat gluten intolerance and celiac disease?

Avoidance. Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease and gluten issues is to eliminate gluten containing foods (wheat and other grains) from the diet completely and indefinitely. Read more...

I have gluten intolerance; but does this mean I have celiac disease?

NO. An intolerance is different from an autoimmune disease. Celiac is an autoimmune disease where antibodies attack the lining of the intestines. In both cases, you will stay away from wheat gluten, but they are not the same process. You can be tested for celiac by a blood test and an endoscopic biopsy. Read more...

Gluten intolerance/celiac disease, can it cause me to miss periods?

Not usually. No, not typically. If your celiac is very severe and out of control, this can result in severe iron deficiency anemia or malnutrition/underweight status. These could cause irregular periods. Read more...

Can a thyroid condition cause a gluten intolerance or celiac disease? Can the thyroid cause any other food intolerances?

Hashimoto's thyroid. Autoimmune thyroiditis (hashimoto's) has been linked to higher incidence of celiac disease and vice-versa based on a common genetic trait (the presence of hla-dq2 (and/or -dq8). It is the abnormal reaction of the immune system that attacks both the thyroid tissue and the intestinal mucosa that is the problem. The thyroid condition itself does not cause food allergies. Read more...
Association. Celiac sprue is an autoimmune disease. Those with celiac sprue are more likely to develop thyroiditis. Those who first present with thyroiditis are much less likely to get celiac sprue. If you have an over or under active thyroid then it might affect the way your digestive tract works. You could develop constipation, diarrhea, reflux. Different foods might bother you more if you suffer from this. Read more...