What is the cost of bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia?

Not sure. Cost vary for bone marrow transplantation, depending on the number of hospital days, number of ICU (intensive care unit) days, complications, rejection events, infections, etc... The bone marrow transplant team at each transplant center can give details of costs. A rough estimate would be a quarter million dollars or more.
High. There is nothing special about bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia. All conditions treated this way cost about the same, in the neighborhood of $200, 000. Long term survivial depends upon the experience of the group. The fred hutchinson center in seattle has the best statics for this procedure.

Related Questions

What is the success rate of bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia?

Depends. The bone marrow transplant team at each transplant center can give details of how many of their transplants "take" and how many are "rejected" after transplantation. The numbers may be different for stem cells from umbilical cord blood compared to stem cells from donor bone marrow. The better the match between donor and patient, the less likely a rejection will occur. Read more...
Very good... A number of studies have reported roughly a thalassemia-free success rate of ~80%. If using a full intensity preparative regimen, ~5% can die because of transplant-related complications. In 2007, a small study reported that using a reduced intensity regimen could achieve the same thalassemia cure rates with no transplant-related deaths. Success depends on doing transplant in young patients. Read more...

How long must the child stay in hospital after the bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia?

Varies a lot. The hospitalization duration for a bone marrow transplant varies a lot, depending on the type of complications, such as infections and graft vs. Host reactions, one has after the transplant. A rough estimate is 6-12 weeks. Sometimes, problems occur after leaving discharge, and a patient has to go right back into the hospital. Read more...
Varies. Transplantation is a complicated process, and it is difficult to make predictions. The hospitalization is sometimes quite long (months). Your doctors should explain all of this to you when you consider a transplant. Read more...

How long does it take to become transfusion independent after the bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia?

About 1-3 months. The seattle cancer care alliance site has information on bone marrow transplants: www.Seattlecca.Org the time after transplant is the "engraftment" period (1.5-4 wk) when doctors watch for the transplant to "take" and grow inside the patient. After engraftment, there is a 3 month recovery period when the patient lives near the hospital and is monitored for growth of his new bone marrow. Read more...
Depends. After a bone marrow transplant , it depends on how quickly the "new marrow" starts to work and how well it takes. Your physicians can sometimes give you medicines to help increase your blood counts but that depends on the type of bone marrow transplant you had-- was it a "perfect related match"? Or unrelated mismatch? Autologous ? The best person to ask is your transplant doctor. Read more...

My 9yrs old son suffering from thalassemia pl suggest cheap and best bone marrow transplantation centre?

Hmmm... Your request raises several questions. I assume your child has beta-thal major; that is the only thal diagnosis where a bmt might be appropriate therapy for a 9 year old. Why a "cheap" place? Bmt is a serious procedure, and is not one to consider trying to pay for yourself. If this is medically indicated go to a good program like seattle and have them help you figure out how to pay for it! Read more...
Depends. Depends on where you live (what country and/or state). You should speak to your son's hematologist about this as they are very likely to know the best options for you in your area. Read more...

What are the side effects of bone marrow transplantation tor thalassemia?

Many possible. Possible side effects from a bone marrow transplant include: rejection of the donor marrow, graft vs. Host disease (donor cells attack the recipient), infections (bacterial, viral, fungal, etc...), mouth sores, stomach ulcers, diarrhea, liver disease, seizures, nerve pain, lung inflammation, hormonal deficiencies, osteoporosis, future cancers, etc... Read more...
Many risks. Chemotherapy is often used to prepare your bone marrow to receive the transplant and can have many side effects. You will be at increased risk of infection until the new bone marrow "takes hold". Immune cells in the transplant can also attempt to "reject" your body, called graft vs host disease. For certain diseases, the benefits outweight the risks. Be sure to discuss this with your hematologist. Read more...