8 doctors weighed in:

Can two parents with positive blood types have a negative blood type baby?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Internal Medicine
4 doctors agree

In brief: NOPE

Nope.

In brief: NOPE

Nope.
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Thank
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes it could

Someone who is "rh positive" or "rh+" has at least one rh+ allele, but could have two.
Their genotype could be either rh+/rh+ or rh+/rh-. Someone who rh- has a genotype of rh-/rh-. A father who is rh+ could pass either an rh+ or rh- allele to his son or daughter. And the same from rh+ mother if genotype is rh+/rh-. The children have 25% chance of having rh-.

In brief: Yes it could

Someone who is "rh positive" or "rh+" has at least one rh+ allele, but could have two.
Their genotype could be either rh+/rh+ or rh+/rh-. Someone who rh- has a genotype of rh-/rh-. A father who is rh+ could pass either an rh+ or rh- allele to his son or daughter. And the same from rh+ mother if genotype is rh+/rh-. The children have 25% chance of having rh-.
Dr. Juan Merayo-Rodriguez
Dr. Juan Merayo-Rodriguez
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Dr. Richard Pollard
Anesthesiology

In brief: Maybe

Rhesus transmission (+ or -) is not a clear as the ABO transmission.
This is purely a result of the genetic expression of each parent, and this may be different when their genes are combined in a new child.

In brief: Maybe

Rhesus transmission (+ or -) is not a clear as the ABO transmission.
This is purely a result of the genetic expression of each parent, and this may be different when their genes are combined in a new child.
Dr. Richard Pollard
Dr. Richard Pollard
Thank
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