With bipolar does hypomania always precede mania?

In addition. Changes in mood can be abrupt, whether these moods constitute normal variability or extremes. Moods are like the weather, not just poetically, but scientifically, subject to what are called "phase transitions". Most importantly, mixed states of mania and depression exist are are very dangerous--these are not just the "average" of both.
No. The difference between mania and hypo mania is in part severity of symptoms and in some cases the development of mania may be gradual and preceded by hypomania, but mania also.

Related Questions

With bipolar, does hypomania always precede mania?

Bipolar. Not necessarily, but appears more in bipolar type 2 younger females, at least from my experience. Read more...
Does not need to. An individual can transition directly to a manic state from depressive state or euthymic state. Read more...

With bipolar type 1 disorder does hypomania always precede mania?

Bipolar. Not necessarily, but appears more in bipolar type 2 younger females, at least from my experience. Read more...
Not always. In type 1 bipolar disorder, the transition from normal (euthymic) mood to mania can be abrupt - without any preceding hypomania. Read more...
Not necessarily. Often mood may elevate somewhat slowly so that one is hypomanic on the way to mania. But often, too, the transition to mania is so abrupt that any intermediate state is too short-lived to matter. That said, someone with bipolar I who becomes manic should be concerned that it is an intermediate stage with more severe symptoms to come. Read more...

Bipolar : could severely reduced calories or not eating trigger mania / hypomania?

Interesting question. Not sure from a metabolic standpoint, but decreased appetite is often part of mood changes, sometimes people cycle from depression where appetite is low, into mania. It may also be someone is becoming so manic they are not stopping to ear, or the stress of some extreme diet acts generally to trigger a manic episode. In any event it is serious and requires a medical/psychiatric consult. Read more...
Causality? Reduced appetite is a part of a manic state. The mind, brain and body form a unity that we perceive (somewhat artificially, maybe) as separate. So the impulse to restrict food may seem freely willed, but may actually be part of an elevating mood. Rather than seeing the one as "causing" the other, they interact as a whole. Read more...
If it became enough. Of stress on the person it may. There are many types of stressors which may trigger mania or hypomania. Prescription medications are one (antidepressants, stimulants, steroids, decongestants, asthma inhalers ; antabuse) as well as caffeine ; illicit drugs. Lack of sleep, menses, head injury, ms ; infectious diseases are other causes. Psychosocial stressors may include death of loved one, divorce, . Read more...

Can people with bipolar have episodes of hypomania before depression as well as before mania?

Yes. This is the more common pattern of mania or hypomania followed by episodes of depression. As patients get older the manias become shorter and less frequent while the depression gets longer and worse. This is why early treatment is so important to prevent this worsening. Read more...
Yes. The pattern of mood cycling varies both between individuals as well as within the same individual. The pattern you describe is possible. Read more...

Does everybody who experiences mania or hypomania of bipolar disorder require very little sleep (in the period of time that they are 'up')?

Manic & hypomanic. Episodes do not always include little need for sleep. That is just one of several possible symptoms, including high energy, euphoria, impulsive behavior, unrealistic or risky ideas and plans, rapid speech & thinking. A hypomanic period may be quite productive and not recognized as a problem. Read more...
Sleep and mood. Decreased need for sleep is a common but not a diagnostically required symptom of either a hypo manic or manic episode. Read more...

What do you suggest if I have bipolar 1 with psychosis. Has anyone else noticed in mania or hypomania things sound and look better than normal?

Treatment . Bipolar disorder is a serious condition that has many effective treatments. Mania is complicated by psychosis 40% of the time which can alter how things look and sound. Read more...

Does the DSM-V acknowledge mixed episodes in bipolar II disorder? My mood shifts: depression, hypomania, mixed episodes but no mania is this BPI or II

Yes. The DSM-4 did not, but DSM-5 removed that oversight. There is very little real world distinction between the two classifications apart from full mania or hypomania. Might even be the same illness but simply a matter of severity on a spectrum (like Rheumatoid Arthritis for instance). Please visit with a capable psychiatrist for top notch care! Read more...
This distinction may. Be understood & applied to ur case on talking w ur MD. In very basic terms, what distinguishes bipolar I from bipolar II is presence of mania, as opposed to hypomania only. Some sxs are severe enough that they only occur in Bipolar I or mixed episodes including delusions, sxs, necessitating immediate hospitalization, catatonic sxs. Talk with ur md abt ur case specifically for best dx & care! :) . Read more...