What type of anesthesia is usually given for a ganglion cyst removal?

Local and sedation. Many ganglion cysts are found on the inner part of the wrist. Most of the time, they can be removed under local anesthesia (numbing medicine given by the surgeon) with some sedation given by the anesthesiologist to help you relax and help with any other discomfort. This is a minor procedure that can usually be done on an outpatient basis so that you can go home the same day.
Depends on site. This can depend on the site and the surgeon's preference. In the lower limb many times this can be done under local anesthesia with sedation. Talk to your surgeon about specifics and any concerns you have preoperatively.
Varies. Frequently this is a surgeon choice. The procedure can be done under local with sedation, a regional anesthetic with sedation, or a general anesthetic. Talk to your surgeon to discuss the management of this case.
Bier block. Most of my patients get a bier block. That is where a tourniquet is place on the arm and then after squeezing the blood out of your arm, the vascular system in the arm, is filled with Lidocaine and the arm goes numb.
Local or general. It could be done under general anesthesia, direct local injection at the site or blocking the nerves at the axilla. All are safe and painless.

Related Questions

What type of anesthesia is given for a ganglion cyst removal?

Often Local. Local anesthesia works well. However, depending on its size, depth, location and coexisting medical problems, supplemental anesthesia may be helpful for your comfort. Read more...
Local anesthesia. Depending on the location local anesthesia is the most commonly employed anesthetic for ganglion cyst removal. Read more...
Hand Anesthesia. Ganglion cysts can be treated under local anesthesia, or they can be treated with general anesthesia. The decision is made after a discussion of your desires, and an evaluation of your general health. If you dont have any cardiac diseases, then generally anesthesia can safely be performed. Read more...
Varies. This can range from a regional anesthetic with sedation to a full general anesthetic. Often it is surgeon specific. Talk to your anesthesiologist about what you would like. Read more...
Local. this can be performed under local if you prefer. Read more...