Why should an endodontist do my root canal and not my regular dentist?

C prior answers ++. Ever good health professional--- be it physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, generalist (regular), chiropractic, acupuncturist, osteopath, specialists, physical therapist, nutritionist, alternative medical therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists (md or do), must know their limitations and know when to refer. Basic tenet: first, do no harm.
Maybe not. Many general dentists do excellent endodontic, "root canal", treatment. They have had extensive training and with experience can achieve outstanding results. However, some difficult cases are better treated at a specialist, an endodontist, as they have high resolution microscopes that few general dentists have. Endodontists are able to treat difficult cases with more predictable results.
Root Canal. Your dentist may choose to send you to an endodontist if he feels the case is too difficult or complex for him to treat. This is not uncommon and it simply depends on the skill or comfort level of your general dentist.
Either. This all depends on the complexity of the root canal treatment and the skill, judgement and experience of the general dentist performing the procedure. A general dentist can do these procedures if they have continued extensive training in endodontics and have developed the skill and judgement over time. If a particular general dentist refers to an specialist, that just means the case is complex.

Related Questions

Why would an endodontist do my root canal and not a regular dentist?

Complexity. General dentist evaluate the tooth and see if he/she can do the root canal. If the root canal looks too complex they may send the patient to a endodontist. The endodontist spercializes in root canals and is especially good at complex procedures. Last the dentist for whatever reason may not feel comfortable with doing the root canal.
Expertise. Endodontist have advanced training and specialized equipment and skills that are necessary for many rcts that regualar dentists are not trained for.
Discretion. It is up to your general dentist to decide whether or not he or she is comfortable doing a particular procedure. Most dentists have certain procedures they like and are good at doing, while they avoid other procedures. A root canal treatment is one of those procedures that many general dentists are uncomfortable doing.

Root canal - who does it= endodontist or general dentist?

Root canal Doctor. The answer to your question is both. Most of the time the routine root canals are done by the general dentist. The more difficult root canals or root canals that need to be retreated are usually done by the endodontist. Some general dentists do not like to do root canals, so they refer them to the endodontist.
Depends. Some general dentists will do root canals and some do not. Also it may depend on the tooth anatomy, which tooth, or if it a root canal that needs to be retreated.
No hard rules. Any licensed dentist is permitted to perform a root canal treatment. Many general dentists, however, are uncomfortable, unskilled, or don't like to do all or certain root canal treatments.

Can a general dentist do a root canal or only an endodontist?

Any licensed dentist. I believe, like here in missouri, any general dentist can perform any aspect of dentistry a specialist would do. There are many gps who like doing things like root canals and are very good at it. They just never went to a grauate training program for a specialty certificate. Just like a gp can remove teeth, like an oral surgeon. The gps choice.
Yes. As long as the dentiste tells you he can do it, that means he can do it as well as an endodontist. Ask if he wants to refer you. A dentist must never do something whicfh is beyond his/her ability. So if the dentist tellsyou he cand dot then O.K. I prefer to go to an endodontist.
Yes. I already did answer this question. A board certified endodontist had more training, but some are easy cases, and pose no problem for a g p to do. If your dentist tells you he can do it, ask if he wants to refer you or he wants to do it, and then he must do it as well as a specialist..
Either. This all depends on the complexity of the root canal treatment and the skill, judgement and experience of the general dentist performing the procedure. A general dentist can do these procedures if they have continued extensive training in endodontics and have developed the skill and judgement over time.

Should I go to a general dentist or a endodontist for a root canal?

Either. This all depends on the complexity of the root canal treatment and the skill, judgement and experience of the general dentist performing the procedure. A general dentist can do these procedures if they have continued extensive training in endodontics and have developed the skill and judgement over time.
Either. A general dentist often can do the root canals, but many don't want to anymore. They may refer you in some instances if the dentist feels that the root canal is best done by a specialist. Decision often is made depending upon the difficulty and time management.
Go to someone good. It doesn't matter whether you have your root canal treatment done by an endodontist or by a general dentist. What matters is their competence. An endodontist has more formal training. However, there are plenty of incompetent endodontists, and plenty of superior general dentists who can deliver great results. See a reputable dentist you can trust, and they'll recommend a course of action.

Do you have to go to an endodontist instead of a dentist if you want your root canal?

No. Many general dentists perform root canals on a daily basis. However, if a general dentist does not feel comfortable, or prefers not to perform the root canals, they will refer you to the endodontist (root canal specialist). Please consult your dentist for his/her preferences.
Endodontist. No, your general dentist can perform root canals if he is comfortable doing so. Difficult cases are often referred to specialist.
Maybe not. Many general dentists are able to do excellent root canals with experience. Difficult cases are better treated by an endodontist as they have high resolution microscopes that most general dentists do not. I have been practicing dentistry as a general dentist for 26 years and have treated over 1500 endodontic cases with excellent results. That said I refer cases to endodntists that are difficult.
Either. This all depends on the complexity of the root canal treatment and the skill, judgement and experience of the general dentist performing the procedure. A general dentist can do these procedures if they have continued extensive training in endodontics and have developed the skill and judgement over time.

Personal opinion is that a general dentist should refer a root canal out to an endodontist. Would you not want that if you were a trained endodontist?

This depends on the. Comfort level and training of your dentist. A general dentist with proper training is capable of providing a root canal therapy within their ability. Referral to an endodontist should always be exercised for root canals that are too complex, or outside the comfort and training level of the dentist. Not all root canals need to be referred, but you can see a specialist if desired. Good luck.
Not black and white. I ask you if a general dentist that has been doing 10 root canals a week for 10 years is less qualified to treat a simple anterior tooth than a newly graduated endodontist? The standard of care is the same. People are the variable, you have good dentist and bad, just as you have good endodontist and bad. Most dentist I know are very conscientious and treat only within their comfort zone.
Ability, not degree. In almost all cases, endodontists do have more training than general dentists in performing rct. That does not insure better treatment nor a more successful outcome. Ultimately it is the care, expertise and proficiency for each and every case that determines the quality of care, and not necessarily the degree. It is always best to give patients the choice and let them decide what they want to do.
Yes. That being said, as an endodontist, about 30% of the cases I treat are previous root canals that are problematic, or failing. That's not to say a general dentist can't do a good root canal or and endodontist always does. But an endodontist with a stellar reputation is I believe, your best choice. Root canals are like fingerprints, no two exactly alike. Microscopically trained endodontist is best.
I Do Endo Daily. General dentists must be able to perform root canals at the same level of outcome as a specialist, or refer to a specialist. That said, many general dentists are exceptional at endo procedures, some choose not to perform them at all. Either way, if a general dentists performs root canals, they should take the necessary ceus, often, to stay current on the best equipment, techniques, and diagnosis.

How is better for a molar root canal- a general dentist or an endodontist?

Both are qualified. To do them. An endodontist is a specialist who has completed two additional years of schooling for root canals. Root canals can often be very difficult to treat. Undoubtedly the fee charged by an endodontist is higher than that of a gp. If your dentist is comfortable with molar endo and you are comfortable with your dentists capabilities, then I'm sure he will do a good job for you. Hope this.
Endodontist. Endodontist has specialized in root canals. They have the education and training to handle all aspects of root canal treatment. Many general dentists will do root canals but especially for the back teeth, molars, that are more complex it is better to go to the expert in the field.
Microscopic Endo. Root canals are not just canals, but root canal systems. They are anatomically complex! A microscopically trained endodontist understands these complexities best and is always your best choice.

Had root canal done. Now part of tooth is still painful. Endodontist says maybe a crack. Dentist wants to save tooth should I have it pulled?

What to do? Unfortunately we cannot evaluate whether or not the tooth can be saved or should be extracted. Nor can we properly discuss options, prognosis, treatment options without personally clinically examining & seeing x-rays of your teeth. There are just too many factors involved and we need much more information which is not supplied to guide you to proper course of action. If unsure get a second opinion.
Wants and needs. What want to do and what we need to do may be different. If the tooth is cracked, it may be hopeless. Only the practitioners who are treating you can make the final call. I would not invest more time or money into restoring that tooth unless you are pain free. Implants may be an option.