4 doctors weighed in:

Should I worry about my 2 yr old pulling her hair out as she lays down for her nap? Bald spot forming in back. Spoke to ped didn't seem concerned

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joseph Eastern
Dermatology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Trichotillomania

Trichotillomania is no more worrisome, imo, than any other bad habit, except that others can see the evidence.
The hair will grow back, but you want to gently break this habit before it gets entrenched. You might consider cutting her hair short enough that she can't pull it, or braiding it (not too tightly). And perhaps get her a stuffed animal that she can pull at instead, as a distraction.

In brief: Trichotillomania

Trichotillomania is no more worrisome, imo, than any other bad habit, except that others can see the evidence.
The hair will grow back, but you want to gently break this habit before it gets entrenched. You might consider cutting her hair short enough that she can't pull it, or braiding it (not too tightly). And perhaps get her a stuffed animal that she can pull at instead, as a distraction.
Dr. Joseph Eastern
Dr. Joseph Eastern
Thank
Dr. Glen Elliott
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Worth watching

You don't indicate how long this has gone on and if something has changed in the child's life.
Hair twirling often is a self-soothing behavior that may indicate the child is feeling under some type of stress. It well may pass on its own. If it does not, consider meeting with a young-child mental health specialist to discuss possible causes.

In brief: Worth watching

You don't indicate how long this has gone on and if something has changed in the child's life.
Hair twirling often is a self-soothing behavior that may indicate the child is feeling under some type of stress. It well may pass on its own. If it does not, consider meeting with a young-child mental health specialist to discuss possible causes.
Dr. Glen Elliott
Dr. Glen Elliott
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Glen Elliott
Feels like a form of self-soothing--we all have them. Dr. Eastern's suggestion of cutting her hair short for time, combined with seeing you/she can find another soothing activity such as a really soft toy or blanket, might be worth the effort. I agree that co-sleeping can be a short-term solution that tends to be hard to break out of, once established.
Dr. Glen Elliott
This is the sort of thing with which behavioral therapists can be superbly helpful, if you get worried enough to seek professional help.
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