What exactly is done in surgery for epiploic appendagitis?

Look. There could be a laparoscopic look to find the epiploic appendage, a normal fatty structure that can become twisted. But if the condition is known, then surgery is not necessary. The surgery may be done to look for other conditions such as appendicitis.

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What exactly is done in a surgery for epiploic appendagitis?

Not surgical. Epiploic appendices are small, fat-filled sacs or finger-like projections along the surface of the upper and lower colon and rectum. They may become acutely inflamed as a result of torsion (twisting) or venous thrombosis. Epiploic appendagitis can cause severe pain and discomfort. Is self-limiting, and is generally treated with an anti-inflammatory and a moderate to severe pain medication. Read more...
Simple amputation. Usually the torsed (twisted) epiploic appendage is obvious at operation. It is usually dark and the twisted portion is very clear. One can be stapled, tied, cauterized or amputated with any of the energy delivery devices to remove it and send it to the pathology lab. This can be done with a laparoscopic or open approach. Read more...

What is done in a surgery for epiploic appendagitis?

Simple removal. The affected epiploic appendices is removed. It's just a twisted piece of fat that normally lies along the bowel. It can be misinterpreted as appendicitis or even cholecystitis. I do this laparoscopically as an outpatient , BUT if the pain is tolerable the piece of fat will resorb as it dies. More common than you might imagine; I see one every year or two. Good luck. Read more...